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Have I Performed the Right Operation?

Have I Performed the Right Operation? This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The concept of this article has grown out of a lifetime experience of performing thousands of operations and answering the query as to whether they were the "right operations." I tried to analyze this from the reality of the medical and surgical point of view and with a balance of philosophy. This balancing act was quite revealing in both answering and asking questions. I am not so presumptuous as to think that I can answer this enigmatic and challenging proposition or, indeed, that there is a universal answer. This proposition has ramifications that extend not only into the foundations of our professionalism, but also into the delicate fabric of our moral and ethical existence. This personal interrogation may unsettle our equanimity, equate our craftsmanship, and question our integrity with haunting queries as to "What is the right operation?" and "How do we know?" I have intentionally used the plural personal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Have I Performed the Right Operation?

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0886-4470
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1986.03780040025006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The concept of this article has grown out of a lifetime experience of performing thousands of operations and answering the query as to whether they were the "right operations." I tried to analyze this from the reality of the medical and surgical point of view and with a balance of philosophy. This balancing act was quite revealing in both answering and asking questions. I am not so presumptuous as to think that I can answer this enigmatic and challenging proposition or, indeed, that there is a universal answer. This proposition has ramifications that extend not only into the foundations of our professionalism, but also into the delicate fabric of our moral and ethical existence. This personal interrogation may unsettle our equanimity, equate our craftsmanship, and question our integrity with haunting queries as to "What is the right operation?" and "How do we know?" I have intentionally used the plural personal

Journal

Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1986

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