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HARVEY CUSHING

HARVEY CUSHING To the Editor:— On Oct. 7, 1939, Harvey Cushing whose work and personality were among the glories of American medicine, died. Cushing was the incarnation of the highest ideals in research and medical practice. When, in 1935, his "Intracranial Tumors" was published in Berlin I remember the admiration aroused by reading, in his own fascinating, modest words, the extraordinary fact that on Aug. 15, 1931, he had successfully performed his 2,000th brain operation. The man and his work were enthusiastically described by Prof. Fedor Krause, a great predecessor of Cushing in the field of surgery of the central nervous system, through whom I received some of Cushing's papers on war injuries to the brain. From December, 1916, to April, 1918, I was military assistant at the surgical clinic of the University of Greifswald where we had to operate on many patients with brain abscesses caused by shell injuries. Cushing was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

HARVEY CUSHING

JAMA , Volume 171 (13) – Nov 28, 1959

HARVEY CUSHING

Abstract



To the Editor:—
On Oct. 7, 1939, Harvey Cushing whose work and personality were among the glories of American medicine, died. Cushing was the incarnation of the highest ideals in research and medical practice. When, in 1935, his "Intracranial Tumors" was published in Berlin I remember the admiration aroused by reading, in his own fascinating, modest words, the extraordinary fact that on Aug. 15, 1931, he had successfully performed his 2,000th...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010310098023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor:— On Oct. 7, 1939, Harvey Cushing whose work and personality were among the glories of American medicine, died. Cushing was the incarnation of the highest ideals in research and medical practice. When, in 1935, his "Intracranial Tumors" was published in Berlin I remember the admiration aroused by reading, in his own fascinating, modest words, the extraordinary fact that on Aug. 15, 1931, he had successfully performed his 2,000th brain operation. The man and his work were enthusiastically described by Prof. Fedor Krause, a great predecessor of Cushing in the field of surgery of the central nervous system, through whom I received some of Cushing's papers on war injuries to the brain. From December, 1916, to April, 1918, I was military assistant at the surgical clinic of the University of Greifswald where we had to operate on many patients with brain abscesses caused by shell injuries. Cushing was

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 28, 1959

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