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Hand Lesions Characteristic of Bulimia

Hand Lesions Characteristic of Bulimia Abstract • Bulimia is a serious and prevalent eating disorder in the adolescent population. The pediatrician is often in a position to make the initial diagnosis of bulimia but must suspect the disorder in light of subtle physical evidence. Denial and embarrassment reduce the likelihood of self-report of symptoms. Hand lesions resulting from self-induced emesis have a distinctive configuration and appearance. Noting these characteristic lesions during a physical examination should alert a physician to the diagnosis of bulimia or to an exacerbation of symptoms in a patient whose condition was previously diagnosed. (AJDC 1986;140:28-29) References 1. Pope HG, Hudson JI, Yurgelum-Todd D: Anorexia nervosa and bulimia among 300 suburban women shoppers . Am J Psychiatry 1984;141: 292-294. 2. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , ed 3. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Press Inc, 1980, pp 69-76. 3. Garner DM, Garfinkel PE, O'Shaughnessy M: The validity of the distinction between bulimia with and without anorexia nervosa . Am J Psychiatry 1985;142:581-587. 4. Fairburn CG, Cooper PJ: Self-induced vomiting and bulimia nervosa: An undetected problem . Br Med J 1982;284:1153-1155.Crossref 5. Russell G: Bulimia nervosa: An ominous variant of anorexia nervosa . Psychol Med 1979;9:429-448.Crossref 6. Wynn DR, Martin MJ: A physical sign of bulimia . Mayo Clin Proc 1984;59:722.Crossref 7. Joseph AB, Herr B: Finger calluses in bulimia . Am J Psychiatry 1985;142:655. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1986.02140150030025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Bulimia is a serious and prevalent eating disorder in the adolescent population. The pediatrician is often in a position to make the initial diagnosis of bulimia but must suspect the disorder in light of subtle physical evidence. Denial and embarrassment reduce the likelihood of self-report of symptoms. Hand lesions resulting from self-induced emesis have a distinctive configuration and appearance. Noting these characteristic lesions during a physical examination should alert a physician to the diagnosis of bulimia or to an exacerbation of symptoms in a patient whose condition was previously diagnosed. (AJDC 1986;140:28-29) References 1. Pope HG, Hudson JI, Yurgelum-Todd D: Anorexia nervosa and bulimia among 300 suburban women shoppers . Am J Psychiatry 1984;141: 292-294. 2. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , ed 3. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Press Inc, 1980, pp 69-76. 3. Garner DM, Garfinkel PE, O'Shaughnessy M: The validity of the distinction between bulimia with and without anorexia nervosa . Am J Psychiatry 1985;142:581-587. 4. Fairburn CG, Cooper PJ: Self-induced vomiting and bulimia nervosa: An undetected problem . Br Med J 1982;284:1153-1155.Crossref 5. Russell G: Bulimia nervosa: An ominous variant of anorexia nervosa . Psychol Med 1979;9:429-448.Crossref 6. Wynn DR, Martin MJ: A physical sign of bulimia . Mayo Clin Proc 1984;59:722.Crossref 7. Joseph AB, Herr B: Finger calluses in bulimia . Am J Psychiatry 1985;142:655.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1986

References