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Haemophilus aphrophilus Endophthalmitis Associated With a Filtering Bleb

Haemophilus aphrophilus Endophthalmitis Associated With a Filtering Bleb Abstract Haemophilus is an extremely rare cause of endophthalmitis in the immediate postoperative period, but it is a well-established causative agent of late-onset endophthalmitis associated with either intentional or inadvertent filtering blebs.1,2 To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of endophthalmitis due to Haemophilus aphrophilus in a patient with an inadvertent bleb following cataract extraction. Report of a Case. —A 51-year-old white man presented with a 5-day history of a red, painful right eye associated with decreased visual acuity of approximately 48 hours' duration. His ocular history was significant for an uneventful extracapsular cataract extraction in the right eye with a posterior chamber intraocular lens placement 2 years earlier. He denied any recent history of fever, chills, local eye trauma, cardiac valvular disease, recent sinusitis, or oral soft-tissue infections.Visual acuity was light perception in the right eye and 20/20 OS. There was no evidence of an afferent References 1. Mandelbaum S, Forster RK. Late onset endophthalmitis associated with filtering blebs . Ophthalmology . 1985;92:964-972.Crossref 2. Forster RK. Etiology and diagnosis of bacterial postoperative endophthalmitis . Ophthalmology . 1978;85:320-340.Crossref 3. Sutter VL, Finegold SM. Haemophilus aphrophilus infections . Ann N Y Acad Sci . 1970;174:468-487.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Haemophilus aphrophilus Endophthalmitis Associated With a Filtering Bleb

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1991.01080050024016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Haemophilus is an extremely rare cause of endophthalmitis in the immediate postoperative period, but it is a well-established causative agent of late-onset endophthalmitis associated with either intentional or inadvertent filtering blebs.1,2 To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of endophthalmitis due to Haemophilus aphrophilus in a patient with an inadvertent bleb following cataract extraction. Report of a Case. —A 51-year-old white man presented with a 5-day history of a red, painful right eye associated with decreased visual acuity of approximately 48 hours' duration. His ocular history was significant for an uneventful extracapsular cataract extraction in the right eye with a posterior chamber intraocular lens placement 2 years earlier. He denied any recent history of fever, chills, local eye trauma, cardiac valvular disease, recent sinusitis, or oral soft-tissue infections.Visual acuity was light perception in the right eye and 20/20 OS. There was no evidence of an afferent References 1. Mandelbaum S, Forster RK. Late onset endophthalmitis associated with filtering blebs . Ophthalmology . 1985;92:964-972.Crossref 2. Forster RK. Etiology and diagnosis of bacterial postoperative endophthalmitis . Ophthalmology . 1978;85:320-340.Crossref 3. Sutter VL, Finegold SM. Haemophilus aphrophilus infections . Ann N Y Acad Sci . 1970;174:468-487.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1991

References