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Growth Patterns of First-Generation Southeast Asian Infants

Growth Patterns of First-Generation Southeast Asian Infants Abstract • The growth patterns of Southeast Asian infants appear to differ from those of the National Center for Health Statistics standards for US children. This study examines the length, weight, and head circumference curves of 175 healthy, full-term, US-born Laotian and Cambodian infants seen periodically at a pediatric clinic from birth to 18 months of age. The median length, weight, and head circumference values of these infants were significantly lower than those of the National Center for Health Statistics standards for infants older than 6 months. These differences were more striking in girls than boys. A decision to observe rather than to pursue a diagnostic work-up in an otherwise healthy Southeast Asian infant who exhibits a slow growth pattern may be the most appropriate management style. (AJDC 1988;142:526-531) References 1. Monthly Vital Statistics Report , US Dept of Health and Human Services publication (HRA) 76-1120. National Center for Health Statistics, vol 25, No. (3) , 1976. 2. Health status of Indo-Chinese refugees . MMWR 1979;28:386-390. 3. Nutrition Surveillance, Annual Survey 1980 , US Dept of Health and Human Services publication No. 83-8295. Atlanta, Centers for Disease Control, 1982. 4. Eveleth PB, Tanner JM: Worldwide Variation in Human Growth . New York, Cambridge University Press, 1976. 5. Refugee Reports . New York, American Council for Nationalities Service, (Dec 18) , 1987, p 8. 6. Peck RE, Chuang M, Robbins GE, et al: Nutritional status of Southeast Asian refugee children . Am J Public Health 1981;71:1144-1148.Crossref 7. Olness K, Yip R, Indritz A, et al: Height and weight status of Indochinese refugee children . AJDC 1984;138:544-547. 8. Habicht J-P, Martorell R, Yarbrough C, et al: Height and weight standards for preschool children: How relevant are ethnic differences in growth potential? Lancet 1974;1:611-615.Crossref 9. Graitcher PL, Gentry EM: Measuring children: One reference for all . Lancet 1981;2: 297-299.Crossref 10. Goldstein H, Tanner JM: Ecological considerations in the creation and the use of child growth standards . Lancet 1980;2:582-585.Crossref 11. Smith BJ, Hauck HM: Growth in height and weight of Thai infants and young children, 1952-1954 . J Trop Pediatr 1961;7:55-65.Crossref 12. Barr GD, Allen CM, Shinefield HR: Height and weight of 7500 children of three skin colors . AJDC 1972;124:866-872. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Growth Patterns of First-Generation Southeast Asian Infants

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1988.02150050064033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • The growth patterns of Southeast Asian infants appear to differ from those of the National Center for Health Statistics standards for US children. This study examines the length, weight, and head circumference curves of 175 healthy, full-term, US-born Laotian and Cambodian infants seen periodically at a pediatric clinic from birth to 18 months of age. The median length, weight, and head circumference values of these infants were significantly lower than those of the National Center for Health Statistics standards for infants older than 6 months. These differences were more striking in girls than boys. A decision to observe rather than to pursue a diagnostic work-up in an otherwise healthy Southeast Asian infant who exhibits a slow growth pattern may be the most appropriate management style. (AJDC 1988;142:526-531) References 1. Monthly Vital Statistics Report , US Dept of Health and Human Services publication (HRA) 76-1120. National Center for Health Statistics, vol 25, No. (3) , 1976. 2. Health status of Indo-Chinese refugees . MMWR 1979;28:386-390. 3. Nutrition Surveillance, Annual Survey 1980 , US Dept of Health and Human Services publication No. 83-8295. Atlanta, Centers for Disease Control, 1982. 4. Eveleth PB, Tanner JM: Worldwide Variation in Human Growth . New York, Cambridge University Press, 1976. 5. Refugee Reports . New York, American Council for Nationalities Service, (Dec 18) , 1987, p 8. 6. Peck RE, Chuang M, Robbins GE, et al: Nutritional status of Southeast Asian refugee children . Am J Public Health 1981;71:1144-1148.Crossref 7. Olness K, Yip R, Indritz A, et al: Height and weight status of Indochinese refugee children . AJDC 1984;138:544-547. 8. Habicht J-P, Martorell R, Yarbrough C, et al: Height and weight standards for preschool children: How relevant are ethnic differences in growth potential? Lancet 1974;1:611-615.Crossref 9. Graitcher PL, Gentry EM: Measuring children: One reference for all . Lancet 1981;2: 297-299.Crossref 10. Goldstein H, Tanner JM: Ecological considerations in the creation and the use of child growth standards . Lancet 1980;2:582-585.Crossref 11. Smith BJ, Hauck HM: Growth in height and weight of Thai infants and young children, 1952-1954 . J Trop Pediatr 1961;7:55-65.Crossref 12. Barr GD, Allen CM, Shinefield HR: Height and weight of 7500 children of three skin colors . AJDC 1972;124:866-872.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1988

References