Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Growth in Obesity

Growth in Obesity Abstract The massive British data of Sargent and Blanchflower1 fully confirm earlier evidence that obese individuals tend to be taller than their nonobese peers during the growing period, although not necessarily during adulthood.2,3 Indeed, the 3-cm stature superiority of the obese participants of both sexes at 14 years of age may well be approximately 6 cm if the corresponding bottom 10% of the body mass index were used for comparison. In our experience, obese persons are not only taller during growth but developmentally advanced, as shown by earlier ages at menarche in girls and advanced bone ages in both sexes.4 They therefore grow faster and stop growing earlier, which is why obese persons are not taller as adults (actually, they are slightly shorter).5 Finally, the lower reading scores at and the lesser degree of education after 16 years of age raise more questions about the family structure References 1. Sargent JD, Blanchflower DG. Obesity and stature in adolescence and earnings in young adulthood: analysis of a British birth cohort . Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 1994;148:681-687.Crossref 2. Garn SM, Clark DC, Guire KE. Level of fatness and size attainment . Am J Phys Anthropol . 1974;40:447-449.Crossref 3. Garn SM, Rosenberg K, Schaefer AE. Relationship between fatness level and size attainment in Central America . Ecol Food Nutr . 1983;13:157-165.Crossref 4. Garn SM, Haskell J. Fat thickness and developmental status in childhood . AJDC . 1960;99:746-751. 5. Garn SM. Obesity in black and white mothers and daughters . Am J Public Health . 1994;84:1727-1728.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine American Medical Association

Growth in Obesity

Abstract

Abstract The massive British data of Sargent and Blanchflower1 fully confirm earlier evidence that obese individuals tend to be taller than their nonobese peers during the growing period, although not necessarily during adulthood.2,3 Indeed, the 3-cm stature superiority of the obese participants of both sexes at 14 years of age may well be approximately 6 cm if the corresponding bottom 10% of the body mass index were used for comparison. In our experience, obese persons are not only taller...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/growth-in-obesity-fQ0xiRAA1k
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
1072-4710
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1995.02170190115023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The massive British data of Sargent and Blanchflower1 fully confirm earlier evidence that obese individuals tend to be taller than their nonobese peers during the growing period, although not necessarily during adulthood.2,3 Indeed, the 3-cm stature superiority of the obese participants of both sexes at 14 years of age may well be approximately 6 cm if the corresponding bottom 10% of the body mass index were used for comparison. In our experience, obese persons are not only taller during growth but developmentally advanced, as shown by earlier ages at menarche in girls and advanced bone ages in both sexes.4 They therefore grow faster and stop growing earlier, which is why obese persons are not taller as adults (actually, they are slightly shorter).5 Finally, the lower reading scores at and the lesser degree of education after 16 years of age raise more questions about the family structure References 1. Sargent JD, Blanchflower DG. Obesity and stature in adolescence and earnings in young adulthood: analysis of a British birth cohort . Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med . 1994;148:681-687.Crossref 2. Garn SM, Clark DC, Guire KE. Level of fatness and size attainment . Am J Phys Anthropol . 1974;40:447-449.Crossref 3. Garn SM, Rosenberg K, Schaefer AE. Relationship between fatness level and size attainment in Central America . Ecol Food Nutr . 1983;13:157-165.Crossref 4. Garn SM, Haskell J. Fat thickness and developmental status in childhood . AJDC . 1960;99:746-751. 5. Garn SM. Obesity in black and white mothers and daughters . Am J Public Health . 1994;84:1727-1728.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1995

References