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Griefs and Discontents: The Forces of Change.

Griefs and Discontents: The Forces of Change. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In a series of diverse papers, Dr. Rochlin indicates that grief and discontent not only begin early in our life experiences but that they constantly influence our interpersonal relationships. The uncertainty of fulfillment and the uncertainties surrounding our expectations leave scars that result in caricatures of human relationships. We erect security operations against these painful experiences. There is a novel twist to this accepted theorem. The author believes that it is not only the source of psychopathology but also a source of pleasure. His studies confirm that real deficiencies can promote noble deeds. From our failure we derive an impetus toward creativity. From our fears of dying we derive convictions about immortality. It becomes apparent that the dynamic forces that result in neuroses may also result in productivity. What is implicit in this volume is that the human condition is unique in that disaster can result not only in chaos http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Griefs and Discontents: The Forces of Change.

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 118 (3) – Sep 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1966.00290150103027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In a series of diverse papers, Dr. Rochlin indicates that grief and discontent not only begin early in our life experiences but that they constantly influence our interpersonal relationships. The uncertainty of fulfillment and the uncertainties surrounding our expectations leave scars that result in caricatures of human relationships. We erect security operations against these painful experiences. There is a novel twist to this accepted theorem. The author believes that it is not only the source of psychopathology but also a source of pleasure. His studies confirm that real deficiencies can promote noble deeds. From our failure we derive an impetus toward creativity. From our fears of dying we derive convictions about immortality. It becomes apparent that the dynamic forces that result in neuroses may also result in productivity. What is implicit in this volume is that the human condition is unique in that disaster can result not only in chaos

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1966

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