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Genomic Profiles for Disease Risk

Genomic Profiles for Disease Risk COMMENTARY Predictive or Premature? be addressed before routine use of presymptomatic testing Kenneth Offit, MD, MPH for hereditary risk for cancer. These requirements included addressing risk of insurance-based discrimination, valida- HERE HAS BEEN A RECENT EXPLOSION OF COMMER- tion of research data by prospective trials, and regulatory as- cial availability of genomic “tests” for diseases, con- surance of accuracy of testing. In each of these areas progress ditions, traits, and ancestry. Dozens of companies ensued. Genetic testing is now part of preventive practice, and Tadvertise their services directly to consumers who, guidelines have been established to inform the targeted use if they are willing to provide a DNA sample (usually from of costly but effective screening technologies. Instead of dis- saliva) and are also willing to pay the charges, can obtain criminating, most insurance companies now pay for cancer genetic information about various health conditions. These genetic testing, preventive measures, and screening. Recent “conditions” range from the tendency to form wet vs dry reviews have documented the disease risks and efficacy of man- earwax to risk for significant adult-onset diseases (TABLE). agement strategies after genetic testing for the most com- Unlike a decade ago, when DNA tests for cancer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Genomic Profiles for Disease Risk

JAMA , Volume 299 (11) – Mar 19, 2008

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2008 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.299.11.1353
pmid
18349097
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENTARY Predictive or Premature? be addressed before routine use of presymptomatic testing Kenneth Offit, MD, MPH for hereditary risk for cancer. These requirements included addressing risk of insurance-based discrimination, valida- HERE HAS BEEN A RECENT EXPLOSION OF COMMER- tion of research data by prospective trials, and regulatory as- cial availability of genomic “tests” for diseases, con- surance of accuracy of testing. In each of these areas progress ditions, traits, and ancestry. Dozens of companies ensued. Genetic testing is now part of preventive practice, and Tadvertise their services directly to consumers who, guidelines have been established to inform the targeted use if they are willing to provide a DNA sample (usually from of costly but effective screening technologies. Instead of dis- saliva) and are also willing to pay the charges, can obtain criminating, most insurance companies now pay for cancer genetic information about various health conditions. These genetic testing, preventive measures, and screening. Recent “conditions” range from the tendency to form wet vs dry reviews have documented the disease risks and efficacy of man- earwax to risk for significant adult-onset diseases (TABLE). agement strategies after genetic testing for the most com- Unlike a decade ago, when DNA tests for cancer

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 19, 2008

References