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GENICULATE GANGLIONITIS (HUNT'S SYNDROME): CLINICAL FEATURES AND HISTOPATHOLOGY

GENICULATE GANGLIONITIS (HUNT'S SYNDROME): CLINICAL FEATURES AND HISTOPATHOLOGY Abstract Inflammation of the geniculate ganglion, analogous to inflammation of the dorsal root ganglions in herpes zoster, as pointed out by Hunt,1 produces a series of characteristic signs and symptoms. They include deep-seated pain in the ear and in the region of the mastoid, herpes of the auricle and the external auditory canal and, not infrequently, when the inflammation spreads beyond the limits of the geniculate ganglion to involve the motor fibers of the facial nerve, homolateral facial palsy. Involvement of the auditory nerve is likely to occur and give rise to tinnitus, impaired hearing and vertigo precipitating nausea and vomiting. The infrequency with which this syndrome is reported and the atypical features in this instance prompt us to record this case. REPORT OF CASE History.—J. S., a man, aged 51, was admitted to the neurologic service of Dr. I. Strauss on Jan. 16, 1931. Six weeks prior to References 1. Hunt, J. R.: (a) Herpetic Inflammation of the Geniculate Ganglion; A New Syndrome and Its Aural Complications , Arch. Otol. 36:371, 1907 2. A Further Contribution to the Herpetic Inflammation of the Geniculate Ganglion , Am. J. M. Sc. 136:226 ( (Aug.) ) 1908.Crossref 3. Hammerschlag, V.: Die rheumatischen Affectionen des Gehörnerveapparates , Arch. f. Ohrenh. 3:1, 1901.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

GENICULATE GANGLIONITIS (HUNT'S SYNDROME): CLINICAL FEATURES AND HISTOPATHOLOGY

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 19 (5) – May 1, 1934

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1934 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1934.03790050039004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Inflammation of the geniculate ganglion, analogous to inflammation of the dorsal root ganglions in herpes zoster, as pointed out by Hunt,1 produces a series of characteristic signs and symptoms. They include deep-seated pain in the ear and in the region of the mastoid, herpes of the auricle and the external auditory canal and, not infrequently, when the inflammation spreads beyond the limits of the geniculate ganglion to involve the motor fibers of the facial nerve, homolateral facial palsy. Involvement of the auditory nerve is likely to occur and give rise to tinnitus, impaired hearing and vertigo precipitating nausea and vomiting. The infrequency with which this syndrome is reported and the atypical features in this instance prompt us to record this case. REPORT OF CASE History.—J. S., a man, aged 51, was admitted to the neurologic service of Dr. I. Strauss on Jan. 16, 1931. Six weeks prior to References 1. Hunt, J. R.: (a) Herpetic Inflammation of the Geniculate Ganglion; A New Syndrome and Its Aural Complications , Arch. Otol. 36:371, 1907 2. A Further Contribution to the Herpetic Inflammation of the Geniculate Ganglion , Am. J. M. Sc. 136:226 ( (Aug.) ) 1908.Crossref 3. Hammerschlag, V.: Die rheumatischen Affectionen des Gehörnerveapparates , Arch. f. Ohrenh. 3:1, 1901.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1934

References