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Genetically Elevated Lipoprotein(a) and Increased Risk of Myocardial Infarction

Genetically Elevated Lipoprotein(a) and Increased Risk of Myocardial Infarction ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Genetically Elevated Lipoprotein(a) and Increased Risk of Myocardial Infarction Pia R. Kamstrup, MD, PhD Context High levels of lipoprotein(a) are associated with increased risk of myocar- dial infarction (MI). Anne Tybjærg-Hansen, MD, DMSc Rolf Steffensen, MD Objective To assess whether genetic data are consistent with this association being causal. Børge G. Nordestgaard, MD, DMSc Design, Setting, and Participants Three studies of white individuals from YOCARDIAL INFARCTION Copenhagen, Denmark, were used: the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS), a pro- (MI) remains a leading spective general population study with 16 years of follow-up (1991-2007, n=8637, cause of morbidity and 599 MI events); the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS), a cross-sectional general population study (2003-2006, n=29 388, 994 MI events); and the Copenha- Mmortality despite target- gen Ischemic Heart Disease Study (CIHDS), a case-control study (1991-2004, n=2461, ing of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) 1231 MI events). cholesterol by statin therapy. The need Main Outcome Measures Plasma lipoprotein(a) levels, lipoprotein(a) kringle IV for identification of additional causal type 2 (KIV-2) size polymorphism genotype, and MIs recorded from 1976 through factors, and thus potential new targets July 2007 for all participants. for prophylactic treatment, is appar- Results In the CCHS, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Genetically Elevated Lipoprotein(a) and Increased Risk of Myocardial Infarction

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2009.801
pmid
19509380
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Genetically Elevated Lipoprotein(a) and Increased Risk of Myocardial Infarction Pia R. Kamstrup, MD, PhD Context High levels of lipoprotein(a) are associated with increased risk of myocar- dial infarction (MI). Anne Tybjærg-Hansen, MD, DMSc Rolf Steffensen, MD Objective To assess whether genetic data are consistent with this association being causal. Børge G. Nordestgaard, MD, DMSc Design, Setting, and Participants Three studies of white individuals from YOCARDIAL INFARCTION Copenhagen, Denmark, were used: the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS), a pro- (MI) remains a leading spective general population study with 16 years of follow-up (1991-2007, n=8637, cause of morbidity and 599 MI events); the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS), a cross-sectional general population study (2003-2006, n=29 388, 994 MI events); and the Copenha- Mmortality despite target- gen Ischemic Heart Disease Study (CIHDS), a case-control study (1991-2004, n=2461, ing of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) 1231 MI events). cholesterol by statin therapy. The need Main Outcome Measures Plasma lipoprotein(a) levels, lipoprotein(a) kringle IV for identification of additional causal type 2 (KIV-2) size polymorphism genotype, and MIs recorded from 1976 through factors, and thus potential new targets July 2007 for all participants. for prophylactic treatment, is appar- Results In the CCHS, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 10, 2009

References