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GASTRECTOMY.

GASTRECTOMY. Total extirpation of the stomach and a union of the severed pyloric end with the esophagus is an operation almost unique in the annals of surgery. The first operation was performed in September, 1898, since which time four operations have been added to the list, two done in this city. It is with pleasure that I am permitted to present the history of a third as follows: Mrs. S. F., a native of Germany, aged 52, housewife, gave this history: Her father died, aged 48, of pneumonia, the mother at 62, the cause unknown. The patient entered St. Mary's Hospital on June 23, 1898. She had worked very hard for the past twenty years, doing rough work, lifting heavy weights, and as a laundress had used the wash-board a great deal, causing much pressure on the abdomen. She had been married twenty years and had three children, two being still-born http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

GASTRECTOMY.

JAMA , Volume XXXIV (11) – Mar 17, 1900

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.24610110030001l
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Total extirpation of the stomach and a union of the severed pyloric end with the esophagus is an operation almost unique in the annals of surgery. The first operation was performed in September, 1898, since which time four operations have been added to the list, two done in this city. It is with pleasure that I am permitted to present the history of a third as follows: Mrs. S. F., a native of Germany, aged 52, housewife, gave this history: Her father died, aged 48, of pneumonia, the mother at 62, the cause unknown. The patient entered St. Mary's Hospital on June 23, 1898. She had worked very hard for the past twenty years, doing rough work, lifting heavy weights, and as a laundress had used the wash-board a great deal, causing much pressure on the abdomen. She had been married twenty years and had three children, two being still-born

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 17, 1900

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