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Futility and End-of-Life Organ Donation After Traumatic Injuries: Caring for Organs or Patients—Reply

Futility and End-of-Life Organ Donation After Traumatic Injuries: Caring for Organs or... In reply A significant number of trauma patients incur injuries that are severe enough to be fatal before they arrive at a hospital. Professional associations have promulgated the anatomical and physiological determinants that define prehospital futility.1 In our study, the questions we asked the public and trauma professionals were intended to determine their preferences for a place other than the morgue or resuscitation suite where the physician could inform them what happened to their loved one, where they could have a chance to view the body, and where they could receive religious and counseling services. The question did not have any relation to organ procurement. Chapital et al have raised important issues about end-of-life organ procurement in trauma patients. Many states have addressed these issues in their statutes and hospital ethics committees and have actively engaged in determining the best practices concerning these issues. Our study generated data on the interest of the public and professionals on organ donation and living wills, but did not address attitudes to in-house procurement of transplantable organs. Correspondence: Dr Jacobs, Department of Trauma, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour St, Hartford, CT 06102 (ljacobs@harthosp.org). Financial Disclosure: None reported. References 1. Hopson LRHirsh EDelgado J et al. National Association of EMS Physicians Standards and Clinical Practice Committee; American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma, Guidelines for withholding or termination of resuscitation in prehospital traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest. J Am Coll Surg 2003;196 (3) 475- 481PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Futility and End-of-Life Organ Donation After Traumatic Injuries: Caring for Organs or Patients—Reply

Archives of Surgery , Volume 144 (1) – Jan 19, 2009

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.2008.520
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In reply A significant number of trauma patients incur injuries that are severe enough to be fatal before they arrive at a hospital. Professional associations have promulgated the anatomical and physiological determinants that define prehospital futility.1 In our study, the questions we asked the public and trauma professionals were intended to determine their preferences for a place other than the morgue or resuscitation suite where the physician could inform them what happened to their loved one, where they could have a chance to view the body, and where they could receive religious and counseling services. The question did not have any relation to organ procurement. Chapital et al have raised important issues about end-of-life organ procurement in trauma patients. Many states have addressed these issues in their statutes and hospital ethics committees and have actively engaged in determining the best practices concerning these issues. Our study generated data on the interest of the public and professionals on organ donation and living wills, but did not address attitudes to in-house procurement of transplantable organs. Correspondence: Dr Jacobs, Department of Trauma, Hartford Hospital, 80 Seymour St, Hartford, CT 06102 (ljacobs@harthosp.org). Financial Disclosure: None reported. References 1. Hopson LRHirsh EDelgado J et al. National Association of EMS Physicians Standards and Clinical Practice Committee; American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma, Guidelines for withholding or termination of resuscitation in prehospital traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest. J Am Coll Surg 2003;196 (3) 475- 481PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 19, 2009

Keywords: terminally ill,wounds and injuries,organ donation

References