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FUNCTIONING ADRENAL TUMORS IN CHILDHOOD

FUNCTIONING ADRENAL TUMORS IN CHILDHOOD THE OCCURRENCE of hormone-producing neoplasms of the adrenal cortex is rare in childhood. Approximately 30 instances of Cushing's syndrome and 55 cases of virilism due to adrenal cortex tumor have been described in children between the ages of 3 months and 10 years.1 Differential diagnosis may be difficult, and surgery is often hazardous and complicated by postoperative adrenal insufficiency.2 This report deals with a child with Cushing's syndrome and one with adrenal virilism and presents a discussion of some of the problems of diagnosis, surgical approach, and postoperative care. METHODS Skeletal age was estimated by comparison of a roentgenogram of the hand and wrist with the standards of Todd3 or by the 67-ossification-center survey.4 The 17-ketosteroid excretion was determined by the simultaneous hydrolysis and extraction of urine with toluene5 and the aqueous alkali colorimetric procedure of Koch.6 Dehydroisoandrosterone-like compounds were measured by Allen's adaptation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050080748005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE OCCURRENCE of hormone-producing neoplasms of the adrenal cortex is rare in childhood. Approximately 30 instances of Cushing's syndrome and 55 cases of virilism due to adrenal cortex tumor have been described in children between the ages of 3 months and 10 years.1 Differential diagnosis may be difficult, and surgery is often hazardous and complicated by postoperative adrenal insufficiency.2 This report deals with a child with Cushing's syndrome and one with adrenal virilism and presents a discussion of some of the problems of diagnosis, surgical approach, and postoperative care. METHODS Skeletal age was estimated by comparison of a roentgenogram of the hand and wrist with the standards of Todd3 or by the 67-ossification-center survey.4 The 17-ketosteroid excretion was determined by the simultaneous hydrolysis and extraction of urine with toluene5 and the aqueous alkali colorimetric procedure of Koch.6 Dehydroisoandrosterone-like compounds were measured by Allen's adaptation

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1953

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