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Function of Isolated, Perfused Guinea Pig Hearts Stored Under Various Conditions

Function of Isolated, Perfused Guinea Pig Hearts Stored Under Various Conditions Abstract ALTHOUGH successful cardiac homotransplantation depends largely on solving immunological problems causing the rejection phenomenon, methods of acquiring and storing hearts must be developed to make the procedure more widely applicable. A previous publication1 reported investigations aimed at determining the length of time after death that guinea pig hearts could be removed and still function effectively. Hearts removed more than 15 minutes after death failed to reach contractile amplitudes or forces equal to those of control hearts removed from live, anesthetized animals. While it appears that hearts can be removed after death and still function effectively, in the guinea pig at least, this interval between death and removal of the heart seems relatively short. The present study, using isolated, perfused, guinea pig hearts, was aimed at evaluating several storage techniques to determine how long guinea pig hearts could be stored and still function effectively. Materials and Methods Guinea pigs weighing References 1. Redo, S.F.; Glenn, F.; and Dime, S.: An Evaluation of the Function of Guinea Pig Hearts Removed After Death Using the Isolated Perfusion Technique , J Surg Res 2:300, 1962. 2. Barsamian, E.M., et al: The Transplantation of Dehydrated and Supercooled Hearts , Surg Forum 10:100, 1959. 3. Webb, W.R., and Howard, H.S.: Restoration of the Function of the Refrigerated Heart , Surg Forum 8:302, 1957. 4. Bloch, J.H., et al: Heart Preservation in Vitro With Hyperbaric Oxygenation and Hypothermia , J Thorac Cardiov Surg 48:969, 1964. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Function of Isolated, Perfused Guinea Pig Hearts Stored Under Various Conditions

Archives of Surgery , Volume 92 (2) – Feb 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1966.01320200109017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract ALTHOUGH successful cardiac homotransplantation depends largely on solving immunological problems causing the rejection phenomenon, methods of acquiring and storing hearts must be developed to make the procedure more widely applicable. A previous publication1 reported investigations aimed at determining the length of time after death that guinea pig hearts could be removed and still function effectively. Hearts removed more than 15 minutes after death failed to reach contractile amplitudes or forces equal to those of control hearts removed from live, anesthetized animals. While it appears that hearts can be removed after death and still function effectively, in the guinea pig at least, this interval between death and removal of the heart seems relatively short. The present study, using isolated, perfused, guinea pig hearts, was aimed at evaluating several storage techniques to determine how long guinea pig hearts could be stored and still function effectively. Materials and Methods Guinea pigs weighing References 1. Redo, S.F.; Glenn, F.; and Dime, S.: An Evaluation of the Function of Guinea Pig Hearts Removed After Death Using the Isolated Perfusion Technique , J Surg Res 2:300, 1962. 2. Barsamian, E.M., et al: The Transplantation of Dehydrated and Supercooled Hearts , Surg Forum 10:100, 1959. 3. Webb, W.R., and Howard, H.S.: Restoration of the Function of the Refrigerated Heart , Surg Forum 8:302, 1957. 4. Bloch, J.H., et al: Heart Preservation in Vitro With Hyperbaric Oxygenation and Hypothermia , J Thorac Cardiov Surg 48:969, 1964.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1966

References