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From Genome-Wide Association Studies to Next-Generation Sequencing

From Genome-Wide Association Studies to Next-Generation Sequencing Opinion From Genome-Wide Association Studies VIEWPOINT to Next-Generation Sequencing Lessons From the Past and Planning for the Future The question whether common or rare variants will tion.TheassociatedSNP,rs823128,hasaminorallelefre- Manu Sharma, PhD Department for eventually help us understand the genetic architecture quency of approximately 20% in the Japanese Neurodegenerative of complex diseases, including neurodegenerative dis- population as compared with only 3% in the white popu- Diseases, Hertie orders, is currently being debated. Recently published lation. With this minor allele frequency, individual GWAS Institute for Clinical studies of Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson dis- in white populations have very little power to detect an Brain Research, University of Tübingen, ease (PD) are suggesting the role of common and rare association, even though the SNP is well tagged with the German Centre for 3 variants in both disorders. arrays. Neurodegenerative Using 1000 Genomes and HapMap data as a refer- Diseases (DZNE), GWAS and Missing Heritability ence sample to impute genotypes of untyped markers Tübingen, Germany, and Institute for Clinical “Are we ready for genome-wide association studies?” (ie,toincreasegenomiccoverage)andtoperformGWAS- Epidemiology and This question was asked in 2006 to raise issues about based meta-analysis for diverse phenotypes is now rou- Applied Biometry, genome-wide association studies (GWAS). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Neurology American Medical Association

From Genome-Wide Association Studies to Next-Generation Sequencing

JAMA Neurology , Volume 71 (1) – Jan 1, 2014

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6149
eISSN
2168-6157
DOI
10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.3682
pmid
24190229
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion From Genome-Wide Association Studies VIEWPOINT to Next-Generation Sequencing Lessons From the Past and Planning for the Future The question whether common or rare variants will tion.TheassociatedSNP,rs823128,hasaminorallelefre- Manu Sharma, PhD Department for eventually help us understand the genetic architecture quency of approximately 20% in the Japanese Neurodegenerative of complex diseases, including neurodegenerative dis- population as compared with only 3% in the white popu- Diseases, Hertie orders, is currently being debated. Recently published lation. With this minor allele frequency, individual GWAS Institute for Clinical studies of Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson dis- in white populations have very little power to detect an Brain Research, University of Tübingen, ease (PD) are suggesting the role of common and rare association, even though the SNP is well tagged with the German Centre for 3 variants in both disorders. arrays. Neurodegenerative Using 1000 Genomes and HapMap data as a refer- Diseases (DZNE), GWAS and Missing Heritability ence sample to impute genotypes of untyped markers Tübingen, Germany, and Institute for Clinical “Are we ready for genome-wide association studies?” (ie,toincreasegenomiccoverage)andtoperformGWAS- Epidemiology and This question was asked in 2006 to raise issues about based meta-analysis for diverse phenotypes is now rou- Applied Biometry, genome-wide association studies (GWAS).

Journal

JAMA NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2014

References