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Follow-up of Positive Fecal Test Results

Follow-up of Positive Fecal Test Results Opinion EDITORIAL Sooner Is Better, but How Much Better? Carolyn M. Rutter, PhD; John M. Inadomi, MD A large body of research demonstrates that colorectal cancer could be randomly assigned to different follow-up times, screening is an effective method for reducing colorectal can- then patients would be expected to be similar in all respects cer mortality. Screening can detect cancer at an earlier stage, other than time to follow-up colonoscopy. In the hypotheti- before it becomes sympto- cal randomized scenario, an increased cancer risk with longer matic, and the detection and follow-up times would be attributable to the delay in follow- removal of adenomas can up. In the observational study by Corley et al, patients Related article page 1631 prevent cancer. Rates of co- elected when and whether to undergo colonoscopy. The lorectal cancer screening had increased until 2010, at which interpretation that a 10-month delay in follow-up was associ- time approximately 60% of eligible US adults participated in ated with a significantly increased cancer risk was based on colorectal cancer screening; however, screening has not in- the assumption that outcomes in patients who delayed creased since that time. Colonoscopy is the most commonly follow-up inform the counterfactual outcomes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Follow-up of Positive Fecal Test Results

JAMA , Volume 317 (16) – Apr 25, 2017

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2017.3629
pmid
28444260
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Sooner Is Better, but How Much Better? Carolyn M. Rutter, PhD; John M. Inadomi, MD A large body of research demonstrates that colorectal cancer could be randomly assigned to different follow-up times, screening is an effective method for reducing colorectal can- then patients would be expected to be similar in all respects cer mortality. Screening can detect cancer at an earlier stage, other than time to follow-up colonoscopy. In the hypotheti- before it becomes sympto- cal randomized scenario, an increased cancer risk with longer matic, and the detection and follow-up times would be attributable to the delay in follow- removal of adenomas can up. In the observational study by Corley et al, patients Related article page 1631 prevent cancer. Rates of co- elected when and whether to undergo colonoscopy. The lorectal cancer screening had increased until 2010, at which interpretation that a 10-month delay in follow-up was associ- time approximately 60% of eligible US adults participated in ated with a significantly increased cancer risk was based on colorectal cancer screening; however, screening has not in- the assumption that outcomes in patients who delayed creased since that time. Colonoscopy is the most commonly follow-up inform the counterfactual outcomes

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 25, 2017

References