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Fluid Therapy in Hemorrhagic Shock

Fluid Therapy in Hemorrhagic Shock Abstract The role of cardiac output, blood volume, and peripheral resistance in hemorrhagic shock has been well studied. Changes in the extravascular extracellular fluid and in fluid and electrolytes within the cell, invoked by hemorrhagic shock, have received relatively little attention. The larger portion of the extracellular fluid, comprising 15% of body weight, is the interstitial fluid which lies in an inaccessible area for analysis. This interstitial fluid is surrounded on each side by membranes which have functional integrity. These consist of the capillary membrane on one side and the cell membrane on the other. Consequently, all attempts at measurement of the function of the extracellular fluid in the in vivo state have been confined to indirect methods. It is probably for this reason that the functional extravascular extracellular fluid has received so little attention until the quite recent past. This is remarkable in view of the fact that this huge References 1. Shires, T.; Williams, J.; and Brown, F.: Simultaneous Measurement of Plasma Volume, Extracellular Fluid Volume, and Red Blood Cell Mass in Man Utilizing I131, S35O4, and Cr51 , J Lab Clin Med 11:115, 1960. 2. Shires, T., et al: Distributional Changes in Extracellular Fluid During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock , Surg Forum 11:115, 1960. 3. Crenshaw, C. A., et al: Changes in Extracellular Fluid During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Man , Surg Forum 13:6, 1962. 4. Wiggers, C. J.: Physiology of Shock , Commonwealth Fund, Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1950, pp 138-139. 5. Fox, C. L., and Lasker, S. E.: Fluid Therapy in Surgical Emergencies , Surg Clin N Amer 35:335, 1955. 6. Reynolds, M.: Cardiovascular Effects of Large Volumes of Isotonic Saline Infused Intravenously Into Dogs Following Severe Hemorrhage , Amer J Physiol 158:418-428, 1949. 7. Wolfman, E. F., Jr., et al: Donor Blood and Isotonic Salt Solution , Arch Surg 86:869-873 ( (May) ) 1963.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1964.01310220178027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The role of cardiac output, blood volume, and peripheral resistance in hemorrhagic shock has been well studied. Changes in the extravascular extracellular fluid and in fluid and electrolytes within the cell, invoked by hemorrhagic shock, have received relatively little attention. The larger portion of the extracellular fluid, comprising 15% of body weight, is the interstitial fluid which lies in an inaccessible area for analysis. This interstitial fluid is surrounded on each side by membranes which have functional integrity. These consist of the capillary membrane on one side and the cell membrane on the other. Consequently, all attempts at measurement of the function of the extracellular fluid in the in vivo state have been confined to indirect methods. It is probably for this reason that the functional extravascular extracellular fluid has received so little attention until the quite recent past. This is remarkable in view of the fact that this huge References 1. Shires, T.; Williams, J.; and Brown, F.: Simultaneous Measurement of Plasma Volume, Extracellular Fluid Volume, and Red Blood Cell Mass in Man Utilizing I131, S35O4, and Cr51 , J Lab Clin Med 11:115, 1960. 2. Shires, T., et al: Distributional Changes in Extracellular Fluid During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock , Surg Forum 11:115, 1960. 3. Crenshaw, C. A., et al: Changes in Extracellular Fluid During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Man , Surg Forum 13:6, 1962. 4. Wiggers, C. J.: Physiology of Shock , Commonwealth Fund, Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1950, pp 138-139. 5. Fox, C. L., and Lasker, S. E.: Fluid Therapy in Surgical Emergencies , Surg Clin N Amer 35:335, 1955. 6. Reynolds, M.: Cardiovascular Effects of Large Volumes of Isotonic Saline Infused Intravenously Into Dogs Following Severe Hemorrhage , Amer J Physiol 158:418-428, 1949. 7. Wolfman, E. F., Jr., et al: Donor Blood and Isotonic Salt Solution , Arch Surg 86:869-873 ( (May) ) 1963.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1964

References