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FELIX PLATTER (1536-1614) BASLE PHYSICIAN

FELIX PLATTER (1536-1614) BASLE PHYSICIAN Felix Platter (Platerus), anatomist, practitioner, and teacher, was born in Basle, the son of a distinguished father who provided his son with a classical education.1 Young Platter began the study of medicine in 1552 at Montpellier; there he witnessed the dissection of human cadavers, and in 1556 became bachelor of medicine. His round trip, Basle to Montpellier, and his reaction to 16th century medical education were described in his diary, which has attracted considerable interest. The document provides an excellent and authentic portrayal of aspects of life at Montpellier and in central Europe at the time of Rabelais. The introductory paragraph begins:2 From my childhood I had always dreamed of studying medicine and of becoming a doctor. My father desired it as much as I did, for he had himself once approached the same study. He often spoke to me of the esteem that doctors enjoy, and when http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

FELIX PLATTER (1536-1614) BASLE PHYSICIAN

JAMA , Volume 203 (5) – Jan 29, 1968

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1968.03140050041013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Felix Platter (Platerus), anatomist, practitioner, and teacher, was born in Basle, the son of a distinguished father who provided his son with a classical education.1 Young Platter began the study of medicine in 1552 at Montpellier; there he witnessed the dissection of human cadavers, and in 1556 became bachelor of medicine. His round trip, Basle to Montpellier, and his reaction to 16th century medical education were described in his diary, which has attracted considerable interest. The document provides an excellent and authentic portrayal of aspects of life at Montpellier and in central Europe at the time of Rabelais. The introductory paragraph begins:2 From my childhood I had always dreamed of studying medicine and of becoming a doctor. My father desired it as much as I did, for he had himself once approached the same study. He often spoke to me of the esteem that doctors enjoy, and when

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 29, 1968

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