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Famous First Papers for the Neurointensivist

Famous First Papers for the Neurointensivist by Eelco F. M. Wijdicks, MD, PhD, FACP, 289 pp, with illus, $189, ISBN-13 978-1-4614-3181-7, New York, New York, Springer, 2012. In order for any tree to grow and flourish, it must have strong, supporting roots. The same can be said for the fields of science and medicine. Although neurocritical care is a newly recognized specialty, its roots run deep, going back more than a half-century. Dr Wijdicks has been integral to the growth and development of neurocritical care as a specialty. He has cultivated it firsthand, serving as a contemporary of Raymond Adams, C. Miller Fisher, and Allan Ropper, all pioneers in acute neurological care. He established the neurocritical care program at the Mayo Clinic in the early 1990s and has served as the editor in chief of the journal Neurocritical Care, which was first published in 2004 after the foundation of the Neurocritical Care Society. His unique vantage point allows him to bring us a book that few others could produce, Famous First Papers for the Neurointensivist. This book is an original in the field and should be on the reading list of anyone who cares for critically ill neurologic and neurosurgical patients. After a critical review of the medical and scientific literature, Dr Wijdicks presents 60 short, historical essays. In selecting these essays, Dr Wijdicks sought original publications possessing novel observations, techniques, or clinical studies that caused paradigm shifts in the neurosciences. They had to be well referenced, generally accepted in practice, and, lastly, durable to the test of time. After a brief discussion regarding the evolution of neurointensive care units, the beginning of the book covers the first description of clinical signs and syndromes such as the Cushing reflex, Cheyne-Stokes breathing, cerebral salt-wasting syndrome, locked-in-syndrome, and persistent vegetative state. The focus then turns to the initial management of acute care, highlighting interventions such as osmotic agents, hyperventilation, and therapeutic hypothermia. Landmark clinical studies and trials, both positive and negative, follow, and they cover such topics as status epilepticus, factor VII, hemicraniectomy, thrombolytics, and corticosteroids. The book concludes with the development of outcome and prognostic tools in neurological disease (specifically, coma, the evolution of brain death determination, and the ethical ramifications that ensued). Each historical essay is composed of 3 parts. First, the preceding work done is recounted, and this frames the environment in which the article was published, thus creating the historical perspective of each original manuscript. Although some were novel observations and generally accepted, others were contentious to currently held beliefs and dismissed. Next, the details of the articles are described to highlight the original work of the authors. Photographs of the original manuscripts' title pages, as well as relevant tables and figures, are provided. Finally, the message of the article and its effects on current practice and future publications are addressed. Although each essay is exciting and riveting, one stands out prominently in my mind, and it best exemplifies the scope of this work. The management of increased intracranial pressure is a foundation of neurocritical care, but few are aware of how the physiologic principles we use today were established. In 1901, Harvey Cushing published a manuscript detailing the regulation of blood pressure and respiration during cerebral compression. Other articles were published on this subject, but none prior to Cushing's were written with such eloquence or depth. Cushing anesthetized animals with ether and then performed a craniotomy and subsequent cranioplasty with a glass window. A rubber tube was placed in the intracranial vault and expanded with saline in order to acutely increase the intracranial volume. Cushing was then able to correlate blood pressure and respiratory changes to rapid changes in intracranial volume and pressure. He directly observed changes in cerebral arteries and veins through the glass window. This was an amazing feat of medical discovery, but the story was lost to us and to current textbooks and bedside teaching. The historical essays presented by Dr Wijdicks pay great homage to such authors as Harvey Cushing and give us insight into the brilliance of their early work in advancing the field of neuroscience. Reading this book from cover to cover is highly recommended. The writing is clear and concise, and the transitions are smooth. Each essay is self-contained and allows the reader to set his or her own pace. Once completed, the book serves as a great reference book because each essay stands on its own. The photographs of the manuscripts' title pages and key tables and figures are of high quality, and a translation is provided if the original work was not in English. Although Dr Wijdicks has done a superb job of summarizing the details of the manuscripts covered, it would have been nice to have the complete manuscripts available to the reader for his or her own reference, but this is only a minor complaint. Dr Wijdicks has sifted through the library stacks and has emerged with a book that puts the specialty of neurocritical care into historical perspective. In order to know where you are going, you must first know where you have been. This holds especially true for neurocritical care because the specialty continues to grow and flourish. Prose ★★★★ Illustrations ★★★ Science ★★★★ Usefulness ★★★★ Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Figueroa, Division of Neurocritical Care, Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology, and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5325 Harry Hines Blvd, MC 8855, Dallas, TX 75390 (stephen.figueroa@utsouthwestern.edu). Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Neurology American Medical Association

Famous First Papers for the Neurointensivist

JAMA Neurology , Volume 70 (4) – Apr 1, 2013

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6149
eISSN
2168-6157
DOI
10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.2217
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

by Eelco F. M. Wijdicks, MD, PhD, FACP, 289 pp, with illus, $189, ISBN-13 978-1-4614-3181-7, New York, New York, Springer, 2012. In order for any tree to grow and flourish, it must have strong, supporting roots. The same can be said for the fields of science and medicine. Although neurocritical care is a newly recognized specialty, its roots run deep, going back more than a half-century. Dr Wijdicks has been integral to the growth and development of neurocritical care as a specialty. He has cultivated it firsthand, serving as a contemporary of Raymond Adams, C. Miller Fisher, and Allan Ropper, all pioneers in acute neurological care. He established the neurocritical care program at the Mayo Clinic in the early 1990s and has served as the editor in chief of the journal Neurocritical Care, which was first published in 2004 after the foundation of the Neurocritical Care Society. His unique vantage point allows him to bring us a book that few others could produce, Famous First Papers for the Neurointensivist. This book is an original in the field and should be on the reading list of anyone who cares for critically ill neurologic and neurosurgical patients. After a critical review of the medical and scientific literature, Dr Wijdicks presents 60 short, historical essays. In selecting these essays, Dr Wijdicks sought original publications possessing novel observations, techniques, or clinical studies that caused paradigm shifts in the neurosciences. They had to be well referenced, generally accepted in practice, and, lastly, durable to the test of time. After a brief discussion regarding the evolution of neurointensive care units, the beginning of the book covers the first description of clinical signs and syndromes such as the Cushing reflex, Cheyne-Stokes breathing, cerebral salt-wasting syndrome, locked-in-syndrome, and persistent vegetative state. The focus then turns to the initial management of acute care, highlighting interventions such as osmotic agents, hyperventilation, and therapeutic hypothermia. Landmark clinical studies and trials, both positive and negative, follow, and they cover such topics as status epilepticus, factor VII, hemicraniectomy, thrombolytics, and corticosteroids. The book concludes with the development of outcome and prognostic tools in neurological disease (specifically, coma, the evolution of brain death determination, and the ethical ramifications that ensued). Each historical essay is composed of 3 parts. First, the preceding work done is recounted, and this frames the environment in which the article was published, thus creating the historical perspective of each original manuscript. Although some were novel observations and generally accepted, others were contentious to currently held beliefs and dismissed. Next, the details of the articles are described to highlight the original work of the authors. Photographs of the original manuscripts' title pages, as well as relevant tables and figures, are provided. Finally, the message of the article and its effects on current practice and future publications are addressed. Although each essay is exciting and riveting, one stands out prominently in my mind, and it best exemplifies the scope of this work. The management of increased intracranial pressure is a foundation of neurocritical care, but few are aware of how the physiologic principles we use today were established. In 1901, Harvey Cushing published a manuscript detailing the regulation of blood pressure and respiration during cerebral compression. Other articles were published on this subject, but none prior to Cushing's were written with such eloquence or depth. Cushing anesthetized animals with ether and then performed a craniotomy and subsequent cranioplasty with a glass window. A rubber tube was placed in the intracranial vault and expanded with saline in order to acutely increase the intracranial volume. Cushing was then able to correlate blood pressure and respiratory changes to rapid changes in intracranial volume and pressure. He directly observed changes in cerebral arteries and veins through the glass window. This was an amazing feat of medical discovery, but the story was lost to us and to current textbooks and bedside teaching. The historical essays presented by Dr Wijdicks pay great homage to such authors as Harvey Cushing and give us insight into the brilliance of their early work in advancing the field of neuroscience. Reading this book from cover to cover is highly recommended. The writing is clear and concise, and the transitions are smooth. Each essay is self-contained and allows the reader to set his or her own pace. Once completed, the book serves as a great reference book because each essay stands on its own. The photographs of the manuscripts' title pages and key tables and figures are of high quality, and a translation is provided if the original work was not in English. Although Dr Wijdicks has done a superb job of summarizing the details of the manuscripts covered, it would have been nice to have the complete manuscripts available to the reader for his or her own reference, but this is only a minor complaint. Dr Wijdicks has sifted through the library stacks and has emerged with a book that puts the specialty of neurocritical care into historical perspective. In order to know where you are going, you must first know where you have been. This holds especially true for neurocritical care because the specialty continues to grow and flourish. Prose ★★★★ Illustrations ★★★ Science ★★★★ Usefulness ★★★★ Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Figueroa, Division of Neurocritical Care, Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology, and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5325 Harry Hines Blvd, MC 8855, Dallas, TX 75390 (stephen.figueroa@utsouthwestern.edu). Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Journal

JAMA NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 2013

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