Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Familial Schamberg's Disease

Familial Schamberg's Disease Abstract Schamberg's disease, an uncommon disorder of the skin, is manifested by asymptomatic brown macules and petechiae distributed primarily on the lower extremities.1-3 Since the disease is of a benign nature, it is important to distinguish it from the more serious disorders which produce bleeding in the skin. Except for a positive tourniquet test in about half the patients,3 no hematologic abnormalities have been described. The histopathologic picture is characterized by inflammation of the capillaries in the upper dermis, diapedesis of red cells, and the deposition of hemosiderin. Although the changes in the skin may last for months, the prognosis for complete recovery is excellent. The etiology remains obscure, but there have been reports suggesting that irritation from chemicals in clothing may play a role in some patients.4 The purpose of this paper is to describe a previously unreported finding in this disorder, its occurrence in two members References 1. Schamberg, J. J.: Peculiar Progressive Pigmentary Disease of Skin , Brit J Derm 13:1, 1901. 2. Osment, L. S., et al: Transitory Pigmented Purpuric Eruption of Lower Extremities , AMA Arch Derm 81:591, 1960.Crossref 3. Kierland, R. F.: Pigmentary Purpuric Diseases of Lower Extremities , Med Clin N Amer 35:457, 1951. 4. Greenwood, K.: Dermatitis With Capillary Fragility , AMA Arch Derm 81:947, 1960.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Familial Schamberg's Disease

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 90 (4) – Oct 1, 1964

Familial Schamberg's Disease

Abstract

Abstract Schamberg's disease, an uncommon disorder of the skin, is manifested by asymptomatic brown macules and petechiae distributed primarily on the lower extremities.1-3 Since the disease is of a benign nature, it is important to distinguish it from the more serious disorders which produce bleeding in the skin. Except for a positive tourniquet test in about half the patients,3 no hematologic abnormalities have been described. The histopathologic picture is characterized by...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/familial-schamberg-s-disease-C6Xp2v40t1
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1964.01600040028004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Schamberg's disease, an uncommon disorder of the skin, is manifested by asymptomatic brown macules and petechiae distributed primarily on the lower extremities.1-3 Since the disease is of a benign nature, it is important to distinguish it from the more serious disorders which produce bleeding in the skin. Except for a positive tourniquet test in about half the patients,3 no hematologic abnormalities have been described. The histopathologic picture is characterized by inflammation of the capillaries in the upper dermis, diapedesis of red cells, and the deposition of hemosiderin. Although the changes in the skin may last for months, the prognosis for complete recovery is excellent. The etiology remains obscure, but there have been reports suggesting that irritation from chemicals in clothing may play a role in some patients.4 The purpose of this paper is to describe a previously unreported finding in this disorder, its occurrence in two members References 1. Schamberg, J. J.: Peculiar Progressive Pigmentary Disease of Skin , Brit J Derm 13:1, 1901. 2. Osment, L. S., et al: Transitory Pigmented Purpuric Eruption of Lower Extremities , AMA Arch Derm 81:591, 1960.Crossref 3. Kierland, R. F.: Pigmentary Purpuric Diseases of Lower Extremities , Med Clin N Amer 35:457, 1951. 4. Greenwood, K.: Dermatitis With Capillary Fragility , AMA Arch Derm 81:947, 1960.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1964

References