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FACTORS INFLUENCING RETENTION OF NITROGEN AND CALCIUM IN PERIOD OF GROWTH

FACTORS INFLUENCING RETENTION OF NITROGEN AND CALCIUM IN PERIOD OF GROWTH SKELETAL growth terminates with the attainment of sexual maturity and is a function of physiologic age rather than of chronologic age. In this series of studies, nitrogen was chosen as an indispensable component of active protoplasmic tissue and calcium as an essential element of the skeletal system, and their balances were determined under a variety of circumstances. In the period of growth that precedes sexual maturity, the factors—dietary, infectious and hormonal—that affect one of these tends in a general way to exert a similar effect on the other. After puberty, it might be anticipated that the fate of these two items would differ; the need for the storage of calcium is passing, the sharp acceleration of growth in height changing to a decelerating phase synchronously with the attainment of sexual maturity, but considerable growth involving the storage of nitrogen will be involved in the development of the sexual apparatus, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

FACTORS INFLUENCING RETENTION OF NITROGEN AND CALCIUM IN PERIOD OF GROWTH

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1947 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1947.02030010059006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SKELETAL growth terminates with the attainment of sexual maturity and is a function of physiologic age rather than of chronologic age. In this series of studies, nitrogen was chosen as an indispensable component of active protoplasmic tissue and calcium as an essential element of the skeletal system, and their balances were determined under a variety of circumstances. In the period of growth that precedes sexual maturity, the factors—dietary, infectious and hormonal—that affect one of these tends in a general way to exert a similar effect on the other. After puberty, it might be anticipated that the fate of these two items would differ; the need for the storage of calcium is passing, the sharp acceleration of growth in height changing to a decelerating phase synchronously with the attainment of sexual maturity, but considerable growth involving the storage of nitrogen will be involved in the development of the sexual apparatus,

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1947

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