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Factors Associated With Concussion-like Symptom Reporting in High School Athletes

Factors Associated With Concussion-like Symptom Reporting in High School Athletes ImportanceEvery state in the United States has passed legislation for sport-related concussion, making this health issue important for physicians and other health care professionals. Safely returning athletes to sport after concussion relies on accurately determining when their symptoms resolve. ObjectiveTo evaluate baseline concussion-like symptom reporting in uninjured adolescent student athletes. Design, Setting, and ParticipantsIn this cross-sectional, observational study, we studied 31 958 high school athletes from Maine with no concussion in the past 6 months who completed a preseason baseline testing program between 2009 and 2013. ResultsSymptom reporting was more common in girls than boys. Most students with preexisting conditions reported one or more symptoms (60%-82% of boys and 73%-97% of girls). Nineteen percent of boys and 28% of girls reported having a symptom burden resembling an International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis of postconcussional syndrome (PCS). Students with preexisting conditions were even more likely to endorse a symptom burden that resembled PCS (21%-47% for boys and 33%-72% for girls). Prior treatment of a psychiatric condition was the strongest independent predictor for symptom reporting in boys, followed by a history of migraines. For girls, the strongest independent predictors were prior treatment of a psychiatric condition or substance abuse and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The weakest independent predictor of symptoms for both sexes was history of prior concussions. Conclusions and RelevanceIn the absence of a recent concussion, symptom reporting is related to sex and preexisting conditions. Consideration of sex and preexisting health conditions can help prevent misinterpretation of symptoms in student athletes who sustain a concussion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Factors Associated With Concussion-like Symptom Reporting in High School Athletes

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.2374
pmid
26457403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ImportanceEvery state in the United States has passed legislation for sport-related concussion, making this health issue important for physicians and other health care professionals. Safely returning athletes to sport after concussion relies on accurately determining when their symptoms resolve. ObjectiveTo evaluate baseline concussion-like symptom reporting in uninjured adolescent student athletes. Design, Setting, and ParticipantsIn this cross-sectional, observational study, we studied 31 958 high school athletes from Maine with no concussion in the past 6 months who completed a preseason baseline testing program between 2009 and 2013. ResultsSymptom reporting was more common in girls than boys. Most students with preexisting conditions reported one or more symptoms (60%-82% of boys and 73%-97% of girls). Nineteen percent of boys and 28% of girls reported having a symptom burden resembling an International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis of postconcussional syndrome (PCS). Students with preexisting conditions were even more likely to endorse a symptom burden that resembled PCS (21%-47% for boys and 33%-72% for girls). Prior treatment of a psychiatric condition was the strongest independent predictor for symptom reporting in boys, followed by a history of migraines. For girls, the strongest independent predictors were prior treatment of a psychiatric condition or substance abuse and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The weakest independent predictor of symptoms for both sexes was history of prior concussions. Conclusions and RelevanceIn the absence of a recent concussion, symptom reporting is related to sex and preexisting conditions. Consideration of sex and preexisting health conditions can help prevent misinterpretation of symptoms in student athletes who sustain a concussion.

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 2015

References

  • Acute clinical recovery from sport-related concussion.
    Nelson, LD; Janecek, JK; McCrea, MA
  • Individual and combined effects of LD and ADHD on computerized neurocognitive concussion test performance: evidence for separate norms.
    Elbin, RJ; Kontos, AP; Kegel, N; Johnson, E; Burkhart, S; Schatz, P
  • Stability of postconcussion symptomatology differs between high and low responders and by gender but not by mild head injury status.
    Santa Maria, MP; Pinkston, JB; Miller, SR; Gouvier, WD

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