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FACTORS AFFECTING PSYCHOLOGIC ADJUSTMENT IN THE LARYNGECTOMIZED PATIENT

FACTORS AFFECTING PSYCHOLOGIC ADJUSTMENT IN THE LARYNGECTOMIZED PATIENT Abstract LARYNGEAL surgery, particularly laryngectomy, has assumed a large place in the practice of otolaryngology during the past 10 or 15 years. During the last five years, at least 400 articles have appeared in the medical literature on the treatment of laryngeal carcinoma; this number testifies to the widespread interest in the subject and to the fact that surgical treatment is now generally available to the victims of this disease. From the medical and surgical standpoint, the results of laryngectomy are favorable for the survival of the patients and the cure of the lesions, but the fact that the patients recover satisfactorily does not cancel out the striking disability they have to face after the operation; that is, the loss of normal speech. The capacity for articulate speech is the most important feature distinguishing man from the animals. When a man can no longer talk, he feels himself less a man, References 1. Greene, J. S.: Laryngectomy and Its Psychologic Implications , New York J. Med. 47:53-56 ( (Jan. 1) ) 1947 2. Treatment of Disorders of Speech , Postgrad. Med. 1:44-50 ( (Jan.) ) 1947. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

FACTORS AFFECTING PSYCHOLOGIC ADJUSTMENT IN THE LARYNGECTOMIZED PATIENT

A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 58 (1) – Jul 1, 1953

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1953.00710040055005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract LARYNGEAL surgery, particularly laryngectomy, has assumed a large place in the practice of otolaryngology during the past 10 or 15 years. During the last five years, at least 400 articles have appeared in the medical literature on the treatment of laryngeal carcinoma; this number testifies to the widespread interest in the subject and to the fact that surgical treatment is now generally available to the victims of this disease. From the medical and surgical standpoint, the results of laryngectomy are favorable for the survival of the patients and the cure of the lesions, but the fact that the patients recover satisfactorily does not cancel out the striking disability they have to face after the operation; that is, the loss of normal speech. The capacity for articulate speech is the most important feature distinguishing man from the animals. When a man can no longer talk, he feels himself less a man, References 1. Greene, J. S.: Laryngectomy and Its Psychologic Implications , New York J. Med. 47:53-56 ( (Jan. 1) ) 1947 2. Treatment of Disorders of Speech , Postgrad. Med. 1:44-50 ( (Jan.) ) 1947.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1953

References