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Eye Movements During Fantasies: Imagining and Suppressing Fantasies

Eye Movements During Fantasies: Imagining and Suppressing Fantasies Abstract The present investigation is a continuation of a series of experiments on the relationships between daydreaming or fantasy behavior and oculomotor activity during the waking state. One of the most provocative findings of an earlier study by Antrobus et al2 was that eye movements were more frequent when a person attempted to suppress a wishful image than when he sought consciously to entertain it. The finding supported the original hypothesis that suppression was achieved by rapid cognitive shifts, possibly of a visual quality, which might be elicited by attentiveness to both internal or external stimuli. Since eyes were open and vision unrestricted in the earlier study it was not possible to isolate the relative significance of internal and external stimuli in producing eye movement. Additional findings in the previous work also suggested that the enhanced oculomotor activity during attempted suppression might References 1. Although eye movements were also scored with the elimination of concurrent blinks and eye-blinks were also scored independently an analysis of the results using these alternative scores revealed no differences as regards source variables (r=0.86). Data for blinks and eye-movements minus concurrent blinks will not be presented or discussed further in this paper. 2. Antrobus, Judith S.: Patterns of Dreaming and Dream Recall , J Abnorm Soc Psychol. 69:341-344, 1964.Crossref 3. Antrobus, J. S.; Antrobus, Judith S.; and Singer, J. L.: Eye Movement Accompanying Daydreaming, Visual Imagery and Thought Suppression , J. Abnorm Soc Psychol. 69:244-252, 1964.Crossref 4. Deckert, G. H.: Pursuit Eye Movements in Absence of Moving Visual Stimulus , Science 143:1192-1193, 1964.Crossref 5. Dement, W., and Kleitman, N.: Cyclical Variations in EEG During Sleep and Their Relation to Eye Movements, Body Motility and Dreaming , Electroencep Clin Neurophysiol 9:673-690, 1957.Crossref 6. Roffwarg, H. P., et al: Dream Imagery: Relationship to Rapid Eye Movements of Sleep , Arch Gen Psychiat 7:235-258, 1962.Crossref 7. Singer, J. L., and Antrobus, J. S.: Factor-Analytic Study of Daydreaming and Conceptually-Related Cognitive and Personality Variables , Percept Motor Skills ( (suppl 3) ) 17:187-209, 1963.Crossref 8. Singer, J. L., and McCraven, V.: Some Characteristics of Adult Daydreaming , J Psychol 51:151-164, 1961.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of General Psychiatry American Medical Association

Eye Movements During Fantasies: Imagining and Suppressing Fantasies

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-990X
eISSN
1598-3636
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.1965.01720310073009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The present investigation is a continuation of a series of experiments on the relationships between daydreaming or fantasy behavior and oculomotor activity during the waking state. One of the most provocative findings of an earlier study by Antrobus et al2 was that eye movements were more frequent when a person attempted to suppress a wishful image than when he sought consciously to entertain it. The finding supported the original hypothesis that suppression was achieved by rapid cognitive shifts, possibly of a visual quality, which might be elicited by attentiveness to both internal or external stimuli. Since eyes were open and vision unrestricted in the earlier study it was not possible to isolate the relative significance of internal and external stimuli in producing eye movement. Additional findings in the previous work also suggested that the enhanced oculomotor activity during attempted suppression might References 1. Although eye movements were also scored with the elimination of concurrent blinks and eye-blinks were also scored independently an analysis of the results using these alternative scores revealed no differences as regards source variables (r=0.86). Data for blinks and eye-movements minus concurrent blinks will not be presented or discussed further in this paper. 2. Antrobus, Judith S.: Patterns of Dreaming and Dream Recall , J Abnorm Soc Psychol. 69:341-344, 1964.Crossref 3. Antrobus, J. S.; Antrobus, Judith S.; and Singer, J. L.: Eye Movement Accompanying Daydreaming, Visual Imagery and Thought Suppression , J. Abnorm Soc Psychol. 69:244-252, 1964.Crossref 4. Deckert, G. H.: Pursuit Eye Movements in Absence of Moving Visual Stimulus , Science 143:1192-1193, 1964.Crossref 5. Dement, W., and Kleitman, N.: Cyclical Variations in EEG During Sleep and Their Relation to Eye Movements, Body Motility and Dreaming , Electroencep Clin Neurophysiol 9:673-690, 1957.Crossref 6. Roffwarg, H. P., et al: Dream Imagery: Relationship to Rapid Eye Movements of Sleep , Arch Gen Psychiat 7:235-258, 1962.Crossref 7. Singer, J. L., and Antrobus, J. S.: Factor-Analytic Study of Daydreaming and Conceptually-Related Cognitive and Personality Variables , Percept Motor Skills ( (suppl 3) ) 17:187-209, 1963.Crossref 8. Singer, J. L., and McCraven, V.: Some Characteristics of Adult Daydreaming , J Psychol 51:151-164, 1961.Crossref

Journal

Archives of General PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1965

References