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Eye Injury Resulting From Violence: Research and Prevention

Eye Injury Resulting From Violence: Research and Prevention Abstract Since one caveman poked another in the eye, little has changed over the years except the efficiency with which eye injuries may be inflicted on one person by another. For children, the range, accuracy, and injury potential of the rubber-band-propelled paper clip were greatly extended by the BB gun. In war, the progression from thrown stones to arrows, rifles, land mines, bombs, and laser weapons has made eye injury easier to inflict on more people from greater distances. The vulnerability of the eyes to newer weapons is clearly evident from the increase in eye injuries as a percentage of all wartime casualties during the century between the American Civil War (0.57%) and the Arab-Israeli Six-Day War and the Vietnam War (5% to 10%).1 Civilian injuries due to violence are commonly thought to be due to purposeful, criminal assault. Assault such as this accounts for only approximately 20% of the References 1. Hornblass A. Eye injuries in the military . In: Vinger PF, ed. Ocular Sports Injuries . Boston, Mass: Little Brown & Co Inc; 1981: 121-138. 2. Dannenberg AL, Parver LM, Fowler CJ. Penetrating eye injuries related to assault: the National Eye Trauma System Registry : Arch Ophthalmol . 1992;110:849-852.Crossref 3. La Piana F. Development of eye armor for the American infantryman. In: Textbook of Military Medicine. Falls Church, Va: Office of the Surgeon General, US Army. In press. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Eye Injury Resulting From Violence: Research and Prevention

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 110 (6) – Jun 1, 1992

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1992.01080180037024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Since one caveman poked another in the eye, little has changed over the years except the efficiency with which eye injuries may be inflicted on one person by another. For children, the range, accuracy, and injury potential of the rubber-band-propelled paper clip were greatly extended by the BB gun. In war, the progression from thrown stones to arrows, rifles, land mines, bombs, and laser weapons has made eye injury easier to inflict on more people from greater distances. The vulnerability of the eyes to newer weapons is clearly evident from the increase in eye injuries as a percentage of all wartime casualties during the century between the American Civil War (0.57%) and the Arab-Israeli Six-Day War and the Vietnam War (5% to 10%).1 Civilian injuries due to violence are commonly thought to be due to purposeful, criminal assault. Assault such as this accounts for only approximately 20% of the References 1. Hornblass A. Eye injuries in the military . In: Vinger PF, ed. Ocular Sports Injuries . Boston, Mass: Little Brown & Co Inc; 1981: 121-138. 2. Dannenberg AL, Parver LM, Fowler CJ. Penetrating eye injuries related to assault: the National Eye Trauma System Registry : Arch Ophthalmol . 1992;110:849-852.Crossref 3. La Piana F. Development of eye armor for the American infantryman. In: Textbook of Military Medicine. Falls Church, Va: Office of the Surgeon General, US Army. In press.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1992

References

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