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Extralobar (Diaphragmatic) Sequestration of the Lung

Extralobar (Diaphragmatic) Sequestration of the Lung Abstract The Latin verb sequestrare means to separate. The noun sequestrum has well-known orthopedic connotations and is defined in Stedman's "Medical Dictionary" as "a piece of necrosed bone which has become separated from the surrounding healthy osseous tissue." Pryce, in 1946, applied the term to a type of pulmonary pathology wherein the blood supply of a bronchopulmonary segment is derived from the aorta rather than the pulmonary artery. This bronchopulmonary mass could be enveloped by lung (intrapulmonary sequestration) or could exist outside an otherwise normal lung (extrapulmonary sequestration). In either case the idea of necrosis is not implied. There is a loss of bronchial connection (unless infection has caused erosion into a bronchus),8 and a variable venous drainage exists in that blood may return via either pulmonary or systemic veins. An excellent review of the differences between intra- and extrapulmonary sequestration, as well as an explanation of the origin of References 1. Cole, F. H.; Alley, F. H., and Jones, R. S.: Aberrant Systemic Arteries to the Lower Lung , Surg. Gynec. & Obst. 93:589, 1951. 2. Gans, S. L., and Potts, W. J.: Anomalous Lobe of Lung Arising from the Esophagus , J. Thoracic Surg. 21:313, 1951. 3. St. Raymond, A. H., Jr.; Hardy, J. D., and Robbins, S. G.: Lower Accessory Lung Communicating with the Esophagus and Associated with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia , J. Thoracic Surg. 31:354, 1956. 4. Boyden, E. A.: Developmental Anomalies of the Lungs , Am. J. Surg. 89:79, 1955. 5. Pryce, D. M.: Lower Accessory Pulmonary Artery with Intralobar Sequestration of Lung: Report of Cases , J. Path. & Bact. 58:457, 1946. 6. Pryce, D. M.; Sellors, T. H., and Blair, L. G.: Intralobar Sequestration of Lung Associated with an Abnormal Pulmonary Artery , Brit. J. Surg. 35:18, 1947. 7. Smith, R. A.: A Theory of the Origin of Intralobar Sequestration of Lung , Thorax 11:10, 1956. 8. de Beaujen, M. J.; Marmet, A.; Touzard, J., and Boucher, H.: La Séquestration pulmonaire kystique avec artère anormale d'origine aortique: à propos de 6 nouveau cas; problemes diagnostiques , Poumon 10:409, 1954. 9. Clay, R. C., and Hanlon, C. R.: Pneumoperitoneum in the Differential Diagnosis of Diaphragmatic Hernia , J. Thoracic Surg. 21:57, 1951. 10. Torrey, T. W.: Personal communication to the author. 11. Findlay, C. W., Jr., and Maier, H. C.: Anomalies of the Pulmonary Vessels and Their Surgical Significance , Surgery 29:604, 1951. 12. Lindskog, G. E., and Liebow, A. A.: Thoracic Surgery and Related Pathology , New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc., 1953, p. 600. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives Surgery American Medical Association

Extralobar (Diaphragmatic) Sequestration of the Lung

A.M.A. Archives Surgery , Volume 76 (5) – May 1, 1958

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6908
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1958.01280230064009
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract The Latin verb sequestrare means to separate. The noun sequestrum has well-known orthopedic connotations and is defined in Stedman's "Medical Dictionary" as "a piece of necrosed bone which has become separated from the surrounding healthy osseous tissue." Pryce, in 1946, applied the term to a type of pulmonary pathology wherein the blood supply of a bronchopulmonary segment is derived from the aorta rather than the pulmonary artery. This bronchopulmonary mass could be enveloped by lung (intrapulmonary sequestration) or could exist outside an otherwise normal lung (extrapulmonary sequestration). In either case the idea of necrosis is not implied. There is a loss of bronchial connection (unless infection has caused erosion into a bronchus),8 and a variable venous drainage exists in that blood may return via either pulmonary or systemic veins. An excellent review of the differences between intra- and extrapulmonary sequestration, as well as an explanation of the origin of References 1. Cole, F. H.; Alley, F. H., and Jones, R. S.: Aberrant Systemic Arteries to the Lower Lung , Surg. Gynec. & Obst. 93:589, 1951. 2. Gans, S. L., and Potts, W. J.: Anomalous Lobe of Lung Arising from the Esophagus , J. Thoracic Surg. 21:313, 1951. 3. St. Raymond, A. H., Jr.; Hardy, J. D., and Robbins, S. G.: Lower Accessory Lung Communicating with the Esophagus and Associated with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia , J. Thoracic Surg. 31:354, 1956. 4. Boyden, E. A.: Developmental Anomalies of the Lungs , Am. J. Surg. 89:79, 1955. 5. Pryce, D. M.: Lower Accessory Pulmonary Artery with Intralobar Sequestration of Lung: Report of Cases , J. Path. & Bact. 58:457, 1946. 6. Pryce, D. M.; Sellors, T. H., and Blair, L. G.: Intralobar Sequestration of Lung Associated with an Abnormal Pulmonary Artery , Brit. J. Surg. 35:18, 1947. 7. Smith, R. A.: A Theory of the Origin of Intralobar Sequestration of Lung , Thorax 11:10, 1956. 8. de Beaujen, M. J.; Marmet, A.; Touzard, J., and Boucher, H.: La Séquestration pulmonaire kystique avec artère anormale d'origine aortique: à propos de 6 nouveau cas; problemes diagnostiques , Poumon 10:409, 1954. 9. Clay, R. C., and Hanlon, C. R.: Pneumoperitoneum in the Differential Diagnosis of Diaphragmatic Hernia , J. Thoracic Surg. 21:57, 1951. 10. Torrey, T. W.: Personal communication to the author. 11. Findlay, C. W., Jr., and Maier, H. C.: Anomalies of the Pulmonary Vessels and Their Surgical Significance , Surgery 29:604, 1951. 12. Lindskog, G. E., and Liebow, A. A.: Thoracic Surgery and Related Pathology , New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc., 1953, p. 600.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1958

References