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Extracellular Mitochondria for Therapy and Diagnosis in Acute Central Nervous System Injury

Extracellular Mitochondria for Therapy and Diagnosis in Acute Central Nervous System Injury ObjectiveAcute central nervous system (CNS) injury after stroke and trauma remains a clinical challenge with limited diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In this article, we review studies suggesting that after CNS injury, mitochondria can be released into extracellular space as a “help-me” signal to augment recovery. Results are taken from experimental studies in cell and animal models and an initial proof-of-concept analysis in humans suggesting the functional relevance of extracellular mitochondria after acute CNS injury. ObservationsAfter acute CNS injury, (1) mitochondria may be released into extracellular space, (2) mitochondria may be transferred between cells, and (3) levels of extracellular mitochondria may serve as potential biomarkers for recovery. Conclusions and RelevanceFurther translational and clinical studies are warranted to assess the overall hypothesis of using extracellular mitochondria as a therapy and biomarker in the CNS after stroke and trauma. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Neurology American Medical Association

Extracellular Mitochondria for Therapy and Diagnosis in Acute Central Nervous System Injury

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6149
eISSN
2168-6157
DOI
10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.3475
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ObjectiveAcute central nervous system (CNS) injury after stroke and trauma remains a clinical challenge with limited diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In this article, we review studies suggesting that after CNS injury, mitochondria can be released into extracellular space as a “help-me” signal to augment recovery. Results are taken from experimental studies in cell and animal models and an initial proof-of-concept analysis in humans suggesting the functional relevance of extracellular mitochondria after acute CNS injury. ObservationsAfter acute CNS injury, (1) mitochondria may be released into extracellular space, (2) mitochondria may be transferred between cells, and (3) levels of extracellular mitochondria may serve as potential biomarkers for recovery. Conclusions and RelevanceFurther translational and clinical studies are warranted to assess the overall hypothesis of using extracellular mitochondria as a therapy and biomarker in the CNS after stroke and trauma.

Journal

JAMA NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 20, 2018

References