Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Extra Calories Cause Weight Gain—But How Much?

Extra Calories Cause Weight Gain—But How Much? COMMENTARY Extra Calories Cause Weight Gain— But How Much? How Much Are Americans Overeating? Martijn B. Katan, PhD According to the first National Health and Nutrition Exami- David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD nation Survey (NHANES)—a nationally representative study OW MUCH WEIGHT WOULD AN INDIVIDUAL GAIN BY of the US population—women aged 20 to 29 years had a mean eating an extra chocolate chip cookie every day body mass index (BMI) of 23 in the early 1970s. The fourth for life? One approach to answering this ques- NHANES, conducted in 1999 to 2002, found that women aged Htion, frequently used in textbooks and scien- 50 to 59 years (who would have been in their 20s in the origi- tific articles, is based on the assumption that a pound (454 nal study), had a mean BMI of 29, representing a weight gain g) of fat tissue has about 3500 kilocalories (kcal). Thus, a of approximately 16 kg (35 lb) in 28 years (FIGURE, A). How daily 60-kcal cookie would be expected to produce 0.2 kg much overeating is needed to gain this amount of weight? (0.5 lb) weight gain in a month, 2.7 kg (6 lb) in a year, 27 Physiologists http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Extra Calories Cause Weight Gain—But How Much?

JAMA , Volume 303 (1) – Jan 6, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/extra-calories-cause-weight-gain-but-how-much-O1aW6vvm0T
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2009.1912
pmid
20051571
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENTARY Extra Calories Cause Weight Gain— But How Much? How Much Are Americans Overeating? Martijn B. Katan, PhD According to the first National Health and Nutrition Exami- David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD nation Survey (NHANES)—a nationally representative study OW MUCH WEIGHT WOULD AN INDIVIDUAL GAIN BY of the US population—women aged 20 to 29 years had a mean eating an extra chocolate chip cookie every day body mass index (BMI) of 23 in the early 1970s. The fourth for life? One approach to answering this ques- NHANES, conducted in 1999 to 2002, found that women aged Htion, frequently used in textbooks and scien- 50 to 59 years (who would have been in their 20s in the origi- tific articles, is based on the assumption that a pound (454 nal study), had a mean BMI of 29, representing a weight gain g) of fat tissue has about 3500 kilocalories (kcal). Thus, a of approximately 16 kg (35 lb) in 28 years (FIGURE, A). How daily 60-kcal cookie would be expected to produce 0.2 kg much overeating is needed to gain this amount of weight? (0.5 lb) weight gain in a month, 2.7 kg (6 lb) in a year, 27 Physiologists

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 6, 2010

References