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EXTERNAL DISLOCATION OF THE KNEE

EXTERNAL DISLOCATION OF THE KNEE Dislocation at the tibiofemoral joint is rare, constituting about 1 per cent. of all cases. External dislocation occurs in 5 per cent. of these injuries in this location. It is rare in its complete form. When complete the dislocation is usually compound. The following case was incomplete: Dec. 30, 1910: Mr. H. L. L., aged 40, a strike-breraker, was pulled from a wagon, a distance of 3½ feet. He landed on his feet, fell to the ground and was unable to rise. He was taken at once to the Methodist Episcopal Hospital. Examination revealed a left extremity in flexion and some abduction. The outer portion of the head of the tibia was prominent on the outer side; the inner tibial tuberosity was in contact with the external condyle of the femur. The internal condyle of the fe-mur was proportionately prominent. There was slight http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

EXTERNAL DISLOCATION OF THE KNEE

JAMA , Volume LVII (27) – Dec 30, 1911

EXTERNAL DISLOCATION OF THE KNEE

Abstract


Dislocation at the tibiofemoral joint is rare, constituting about 1 per cent. of all cases. External dislocation occurs in 5 per cent. of these injuries in this location. It is rare in its complete form. When complete the dislocation is usually compound. The following case was incomplete:
Dec. 30, 1910: Mr. H. L. L., aged 40, a strike-breraker, was pulled from a wagon, a distance of 3½ feet. He landed on his feet, fell to the ground and was unable to rise. He was taken at once to the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1911 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1911.04260120314008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dislocation at the tibiofemoral joint is rare, constituting about 1 per cent. of all cases. External dislocation occurs in 5 per cent. of these injuries in this location. It is rare in its complete form. When complete the dislocation is usually compound. The following case was incomplete: Dec. 30, 1910: Mr. H. L. L., aged 40, a strike-breraker, was pulled from a wagon, a distance of 3½ feet. He landed on his feet, fell to the ground and was unable to rise. He was taken at once to the Methodist Episcopal Hospital. Examination revealed a left extremity in flexion and some abduction. The outer portion of the head of the tibia was prominent on the outer side; the inner tibial tuberosity was in contact with the external condyle of the femur. The internal condyle of the fe-mur was proportionately prominent. There was slight

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 30, 1911

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