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EXTENSIVE EROSION OF THE BASE OF THE SKULL FROM A LEPTOMENINGEAL CYST: Report of a Case

EXTENSIVE EROSION OF THE BASE OF THE SKULL FROM A LEPTOMENINGEAL CYST: Report of a Case Abstract EROSION of the cranial bones from pressure of a leptomeningeal cyst is an uncommon, but not rare, condition. While the majority of such cysts develop after severe trauma to the skull, usually with fracture, there is evidence that congenital abnormalities in the dura and leptomeninges may contribute to their production. Haymaker and Foster1 reported a case in which a large collection of clear, colorless fluid resembling cerebrospinal fluid was found enclosed between the two layers of the dura in the posterior cranial fossa; a small defect was present beneath the tentorium, through which a lobule of the cerebellum was herniated. While their patient gave a history of a fracture of the skull in childhood, the separation of the dural layers and the small subtentorial defect may have been congenital abnormalities which favored development of a cyst in this location. Leptomeningeal cysts have been noted more commonly in the parietal, References 1. Haymaker, W., and Foster, M. E., Jr.: Intracranial Dural Cyst, with Report of a Case , J. Neurosurg. 1:211-217, 1944.Crossref 2. Dyke, C. G.: The Roentgen-Ray Diagnosis of Diseases of the Skull and Intracranial Contents , in Golden, R.: Diagnostic Roentgenology , New York. Thos. Nelson & Sons, 1941. chap. 1, pp. 302-331. 3. Schwartz, C. W.: Leptomeningeal Cysts from a Roentgenological Standpoint , Am. J. Roentgenol. 46:160-165, 1941. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

EXTENSIVE EROSION OF THE BASE OF THE SKULL FROM A LEPTOMENINGEAL CYST: Report of a Case

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1946 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300150086006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract EROSION of the cranial bones from pressure of a leptomeningeal cyst is an uncommon, but not rare, condition. While the majority of such cysts develop after severe trauma to the skull, usually with fracture, there is evidence that congenital abnormalities in the dura and leptomeninges may contribute to their production. Haymaker and Foster1 reported a case in which a large collection of clear, colorless fluid resembling cerebrospinal fluid was found enclosed between the two layers of the dura in the posterior cranial fossa; a small defect was present beneath the tentorium, through which a lobule of the cerebellum was herniated. While their patient gave a history of a fracture of the skull in childhood, the separation of the dural layers and the small subtentorial defect may have been congenital abnormalities which favored development of a cyst in this location. Leptomeningeal cysts have been noted more commonly in the parietal, References 1. Haymaker, W., and Foster, M. E., Jr.: Intracranial Dural Cyst, with Report of a Case , J. Neurosurg. 1:211-217, 1944.Crossref 2. Dyke, C. G.: The Roentgen-Ray Diagnosis of Diseases of the Skull and Intracranial Contents , in Golden, R.: Diagnostic Roentgenology , New York. Thos. Nelson & Sons, 1941. chap. 1, pp. 302-331. 3. Schwartz, C. W.: Leptomeningeal Cysts from a Roentgenological Standpoint , Am. J. Roentgenol. 46:160-165, 1941.

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1946

References