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Experimentally Induced Hypotension: Clinical and Electroencephalographic Consequences

Experimentally Induced Hypotension: Clinical and Electroencephalographic Consequences Abstract The neurologist is frequently confronted with the problem of syncope and with determining its etiology. Postural hypotension is a possible cause that is considered only rarely in this connection, and the neurological literature is scanty on this subject, although many articles have appeared since its description in 1925 by Bradley and Eggleston.1 It is of further interest that neurological disease may be the primary disorder responsible for the orthostatic hypotension, e. g., syphilis of the central nervous system or syringomyelia. The objective in this investigation was to devise a reliable and reproducible method of effectively, promptly, and safely producing a controllable hypotension, and to observe the associated clinical and electroencephalographic changes. Previous studies2 had demonstrated the efficacy of the technique of placing a subject on a tilt table, injecting hexamethonium intravenously (1 cc/min. of a 2% solution), and raising or lowering the head of the table to obtain References 1. Bradley, S., and Eggleston, C.: Postural Hypotension: A Report of Three Cases , Am. Heart J. 1:73, 1925.Crossref 2. Finnerty, F. A., Jr.; Witkin, L., and Fazekas, J.: Cerebral Hemodynamics During Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Acute Hypotension , J. Clin. Invest. 33:1227, 1954.Crossref 3. Alman, R. W., and Fazekas, J. F.: Apparatus for Continuous Blood Pressure Observation , New England J. Med. 248:105, 1953.Crossref 4. Kety, S. S., and Schmidt, C. F.: Nitrous Oxide Method for Quantitative Determination of Cerebral Blood Flow in Man: Theory, Procedure and Normal Values , J. Clin. Invest. 27:476, 1948.Crossref 5. Scheinberg, P., and Stead, E. A., Jr.: Cerebral Blood Flow in Male Subjects as Measured by the Nitrous Oxide Technique: Normal Values for Blood Flow, Oxygen Utilization, Glucose Utilization, and Peripheral Resistance, with Observations on the Effect of Tilting and Anxiety , J. Clin. Invest. 28:1163, 1949.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

Experimentally Induced Hypotension: Clinical and Electroencephalographic Consequences

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1955 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6886
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1955.02330100048009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The neurologist is frequently confronted with the problem of syncope and with determining its etiology. Postural hypotension is a possible cause that is considered only rarely in this connection, and the neurological literature is scanty on this subject, although many articles have appeared since its description in 1925 by Bradley and Eggleston.1 It is of further interest that neurological disease may be the primary disorder responsible for the orthostatic hypotension, e. g., syphilis of the central nervous system or syringomyelia. The objective in this investigation was to devise a reliable and reproducible method of effectively, promptly, and safely producing a controllable hypotension, and to observe the associated clinical and electroencephalographic changes. Previous studies2 had demonstrated the efficacy of the technique of placing a subject on a tilt table, injecting hexamethonium intravenously (1 cc/min. of a 2% solution), and raising or lowering the head of the table to obtain References 1. Bradley, S., and Eggleston, C.: Postural Hypotension: A Report of Three Cases , Am. Heart J. 1:73, 1925.Crossref 2. Finnerty, F. A., Jr.; Witkin, L., and Fazekas, J.: Cerebral Hemodynamics During Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Acute Hypotension , J. Clin. Invest. 33:1227, 1954.Crossref 3. Alman, R. W., and Fazekas, J. F.: Apparatus for Continuous Blood Pressure Observation , New England J. Med. 248:105, 1953.Crossref 4. Kety, S. S., and Schmidt, C. F.: Nitrous Oxide Method for Quantitative Determination of Cerebral Blood Flow in Man: Theory, Procedure and Normal Values , J. Clin. Invest. 27:476, 1948.Crossref 5. Scheinberg, P., and Stead, E. A., Jr.: Cerebral Blood Flow in Male Subjects as Measured by the Nitrous Oxide Technique: Normal Values for Blood Flow, Oxygen Utilization, Glucose Utilization, and Peripheral Resistance, with Observations on the Effect of Tilting and Anxiety , J. Clin. Invest. 28:1163, 1949.Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1955

References