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Experimental Tonography in Rabbits: Effect of Unilateral Ligation of Common Carotid Artery on Aqueous Humor Dynamics As Studied by Means of Tonography and Fluorescein Appearance Time

Experimental Tonography in Rabbits: Effect of Unilateral Ligation of Common Carotid Artery on... Abstract Clinical tonography, described by Grant10 in 1950, has proved of value for the study of the mechanism of aqueous flow under physiological and pathological conditions. It is of great help in the diagnosis of glaucoma and in the evaluation of the therapeutic effect of drugs and of surgery in glaucoma. Though the simplifying assumption involved in the interpretation and calculation from the tonographic tracings necessarily introduces some systematic errors, these do not detract appreciably from the value of tonography as a means of exploring problems of aqueous flow. The purpose of this study was to investigate under experimental conditions one vascular factor which might influence aqueous flow and to see whether tonography in experimental rabbits could be used as an effective tool for the analysis of the effects. Tonography in rabbits was reported only briefly by Grant.10 He stated that recordings were made on rabbit eyes in the References 1. Friedenwald.9 The validity of applying these tables to rabbits is discussed below. 2. Linnér, E., and Friedenwald, J. S.: Appearance Time of Fluorescein As an Index of Aqueous Flow, preliminary report presented at the meeting of the Wilmer Residents Association, Baltimore, April 2, 1954. 3. If K is smaller in rabbits than in man, the estimate of Po using human calibration tables should be too low. Actual comparison of estimated Po with the final Pt shows that no large correction in this direction is permissible. 4. Bárány and Kinsey.6 Kinsey and Bárány.11 5. Friedenwald, J. S.: Ascorbic Acid Turnover in the Aqueous, read at the 17th International Congress of Ophthalmology, New York, 1954. 6. Peter, P., and Rabaey, M.: Personal communication to the authors, 1955. 7. This work was done at the Wilmer Institute, Johns Hopkins University and Hospital, Baltimore. 8. Becker, B.: Personal communication to the authors. 9. Bárány, E. H.: Influence of Local Arterial Blood Pressure on Aqueous Humour and Intraocular Pressure. An Experimental Study of the Mechanisms Maintaining Intraocular Pressure: II. The Recovery of Intraocular Pressure, Arterial Blood Pressure and Heat Dissipation by the External Ear After Unilateral Carotid Ligation , Acta ophth. 25:81, 1947.Crossref 10. Bárány, E. H.: Influence of Intra-Ocular Pressure on the Rate of Drainage of Aqueous Humour: Stabilization of Intra-Ocular Pressure or of Aqueous Flow? Brit. J. Ophth. 31:160, 1947.Crossref 11. Bárány, E. H.: In Vitro Studies of the Resistance to Flow Through the Angle of the Anterior Chamber , Acta Soc. med. upsalien. 59:260, 1953. 12. Becker, B.: Effect of the Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitor Acetazoleamide on the Composition of the Aqueous Humor, Am. J. Ophth., to be published. 13. Davson, H., and Matchett, P. A.: Control of the Intra-Ocular Pressure in the Rabbit , J. Physiol. 113:387, 1951. 14. Bárány, E. H., and Kinsey, V. E.: Rate of Flow of Aqueous Humor: I. Rate of Disappearance of Paraaminohippuric Acid, Radioactive Rayopate, and Radioactive Diodiast from the Aqueous Humor of Rabbits , Am. J. Ophth. 32:177 (June. (Pt. II) ) 1949. 15. Friedenwald, J. S.: Contribution to the Theory and Practice of Tonometry , Am. J. Ophth. 20:985, 1937. 16. Friedenwald, J. S.: Some Problems in the Calibration of Tonometers , Tr. Am. Ophth. Soc. 45:355, 1947. 17. Friedenwald, J. S.: Standardization of Tonometers: Decennial Report by the Committee on Standardization of Tonometers, American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, 1954, Chap. VII. 18. Grant, W. M.: Tonographic Method for Measuring the Facility and Rate of Aqueous Flow in Human Eyes , Arch. Ophth. 44:204, 1950.Crossref 19. Kinsey, V. E., and Bárány, E. H.: Rate of Flow of Aqueous Humor: II. Derivation of Rate of Flow and Its Physiological Significance , Am. J Ophth. 32:189 (June, (Pt. II) ) 1949. 20. Kinsey, V. E.; Palm, E., and Cavanaugh, G. A.: Posterior and Anterior Chamber Aqueous Humor Formation , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 53:330, 1955.Crossref 21. Linnér, E.: Ascorbic Acid as a Test Substance for Measuring Relative Changes in the Rate of Plasma Flow Through the Ciliary Processes , Acta physiol. scandinav. 26:57, 1952.Crossref 22. Linnér, E.: The Outflow Pressure in Normal and Glaucomatous Eyes , Acta ophth. 33:101, 1955Crossref 23. Seidel, E.: Weitere experimentelle Untersuchungen über die Quelle und den Verlauf der intraocularen Saftströmung: XX. Mitteilung , von Graefes Arch. Ophth. 112:252, 1923.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Experimental Tonography in Rabbits: Effect of Unilateral Ligation of Common Carotid Artery on Aqueous Humor Dynamics As Studied by Means of Tonography and Fluorescein Appearance Time

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1955 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1955.00930020723014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Clinical tonography, described by Grant10 in 1950, has proved of value for the study of the mechanism of aqueous flow under physiological and pathological conditions. It is of great help in the diagnosis of glaucoma and in the evaluation of the therapeutic effect of drugs and of surgery in glaucoma. Though the simplifying assumption involved in the interpretation and calculation from the tonographic tracings necessarily introduces some systematic errors, these do not detract appreciably from the value of tonography as a means of exploring problems of aqueous flow. The purpose of this study was to investigate under experimental conditions one vascular factor which might influence aqueous flow and to see whether tonography in experimental rabbits could be used as an effective tool for the analysis of the effects. Tonography in rabbits was reported only briefly by Grant.10 He stated that recordings were made on rabbit eyes in the References 1. Friedenwald.9 The validity of applying these tables to rabbits is discussed below. 2. Linnér, E., and Friedenwald, J. S.: Appearance Time of Fluorescein As an Index of Aqueous Flow, preliminary report presented at the meeting of the Wilmer Residents Association, Baltimore, April 2, 1954. 3. If K is smaller in rabbits than in man, the estimate of Po using human calibration tables should be too low. Actual comparison of estimated Po with the final Pt shows that no large correction in this direction is permissible. 4. Bárány and Kinsey.6 Kinsey and Bárány.11 5. Friedenwald, J. S.: Ascorbic Acid Turnover in the Aqueous, read at the 17th International Congress of Ophthalmology, New York, 1954. 6. Peter, P., and Rabaey, M.: Personal communication to the authors, 1955. 7. This work was done at the Wilmer Institute, Johns Hopkins University and Hospital, Baltimore. 8. Becker, B.: Personal communication to the authors. 9. Bárány, E. H.: Influence of Local Arterial Blood Pressure on Aqueous Humour and Intraocular Pressure. An Experimental Study of the Mechanisms Maintaining Intraocular Pressure: II. The Recovery of Intraocular Pressure, Arterial Blood Pressure and Heat Dissipation by the External Ear After Unilateral Carotid Ligation , Acta ophth. 25:81, 1947.Crossref 10. Bárány, E. H.: Influence of Intra-Ocular Pressure on the Rate of Drainage of Aqueous Humour: Stabilization of Intra-Ocular Pressure or of Aqueous Flow? Brit. J. Ophth. 31:160, 1947.Crossref 11. Bárány, E. H.: In Vitro Studies of the Resistance to Flow Through the Angle of the Anterior Chamber , Acta Soc. med. upsalien. 59:260, 1953. 12. Becker, B.: Effect of the Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitor Acetazoleamide on the Composition of the Aqueous Humor, Am. J. Ophth., to be published. 13. Davson, H., and Matchett, P. A.: Control of the Intra-Ocular Pressure in the Rabbit , J. Physiol. 113:387, 1951. 14. Bárány, E. H., and Kinsey, V. E.: Rate of Flow of Aqueous Humor: I. Rate of Disappearance of Paraaminohippuric Acid, Radioactive Rayopate, and Radioactive Diodiast from the Aqueous Humor of Rabbits , Am. J. Ophth. 32:177 (June. (Pt. II) ) 1949. 15. Friedenwald, J. S.: Contribution to the Theory and Practice of Tonometry , Am. J. Ophth. 20:985, 1937. 16. Friedenwald, J. S.: Some Problems in the Calibration of Tonometers , Tr. Am. Ophth. Soc. 45:355, 1947. 17. Friedenwald, J. S.: Standardization of Tonometers: Decennial Report by the Committee on Standardization of Tonometers, American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, 1954, Chap. VII. 18. Grant, W. M.: Tonographic Method for Measuring the Facility and Rate of Aqueous Flow in Human Eyes , Arch. Ophth. 44:204, 1950.Crossref 19. Kinsey, V. E., and Bárány, E. H.: Rate of Flow of Aqueous Humor: II. Derivation of Rate of Flow and Its Physiological Significance , Am. J Ophth. 32:189 (June, (Pt. II) ) 1949. 20. Kinsey, V. E.; Palm, E., and Cavanaugh, G. A.: Posterior and Anterior Chamber Aqueous Humor Formation , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 53:330, 1955.Crossref 21. Linnér, E.: Ascorbic Acid as a Test Substance for Measuring Relative Changes in the Rate of Plasma Flow Through the Ciliary Processes , Acta physiol. scandinav. 26:57, 1952.Crossref 22. Linnér, E.: The Outflow Pressure in Normal and Glaucomatous Eyes , Acta ophth. 33:101, 1955Crossref 23. Seidel, E.: Weitere experimentelle Untersuchungen über die Quelle und den Verlauf der intraocularen Saftströmung: XX. Mitteilung , von Graefes Arch. Ophth. 112:252, 1923.Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1955

References

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