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Experimental Rubella Studies: I. Clinical and Laboratory Features of Infection Caused by the Brown Strain Rubella Virus: II. Artificial Challenge Studies of Adult Rubella Vaccinees

Experimental Rubella Studies: I. Clinical and Laboratory Features of Infection Caused by the... Abstract THERE ARE currently several candidate live, attenuated rubella virus vaccines being evaluated in human populations.1,2 The vaccines appear to be similar in their effects, although little information has been obtained on the ability of the vaccines to produce extended protection against natural rubella challenge. Only when vaccinees are exposed to repeated rubella outbreaks during the coming years can protection be properly evaluated. The recent report of Detels et al3 indicated that rubella vaccines were protective, but in this investigation, vaccination and exposure to natural illness were almost simultaneous. The Clinical Virology Section (CVS) conducted a series of artificial rubella challenge studies to determine the protective effect of rubella vaccines. The initial study characterized the clinical and laboratory features produced by the administration of a low tissue culture passage rubella virus strain, the Brown strain. The Brown strain virus proved to be a suitable challenge virus. In the References 1. Perkins, F.T.: A Review of Recent Studies With Rubella Vaccines , Public Health 81:284-288 ( (Sept) ) 1967.Crossref 2. Buynak, E.V., et al: Live Attenuated Rubella Virus Vaccines Prepared in Duck Embryo Cell Culture: I. Development and Clinical Testing , JAMA 204:195-200 ( (April 15) ) 1968.Crossref 3. Detels, R., et al: "The Efficacy of HPV-77 Rubella Vaccine in the Prevention of Disease," in Proceedings of the 23rd Symposium on Microbiological Standardization: Rubella Vaccines , London, (November) 1968, Basel, Switzerland: S. Karger, 1969. 4. Stewart, G.L., et al: Rubella-Virus Hemagglutination-Inhibition Test , New Eng J Med 276: 554-557 ( (March 9) ) 1967.Crossref 5. Schiff, G.M., and Sever, J.L.: Rubella: Recent Laboratory and Clinical Advances , Progr Med Virol 8:30-61, 1966. 6. Lennette, E.H., and Schmidt, N.J. (eds.): Diagnostic Procedures for Viral and Rickettsial Diseases , ed 3, New York: American Public Health Association, 1964. 7. Artenstein, M.S.; Bellanti, J.A.; and Buescher, E.L.: Identification of the Antiviral Substances in Nasal Secretions , Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 117:558-564 ( (Nov) ) 1964.Crossref 8. Smith, C.B., et al: Protective Effect of Antibody to Parainfluenza Type 1 Virus , New Eng J Med 275:1145-1152 ( (Nov 24) ) 1966.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Experimental Rubella Studies: I. Clinical and Laboratory Features of Infection Caused by the Brown Strain Rubella Virus: II. Artificial Challenge Studies of Adult Rubella Vaccinees

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1969.02100040271024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THERE ARE currently several candidate live, attenuated rubella virus vaccines being evaluated in human populations.1,2 The vaccines appear to be similar in their effects, although little information has been obtained on the ability of the vaccines to produce extended protection against natural rubella challenge. Only when vaccinees are exposed to repeated rubella outbreaks during the coming years can protection be properly evaluated. The recent report of Detels et al3 indicated that rubella vaccines were protective, but in this investigation, vaccination and exposure to natural illness were almost simultaneous. The Clinical Virology Section (CVS) conducted a series of artificial rubella challenge studies to determine the protective effect of rubella vaccines. The initial study characterized the clinical and laboratory features produced by the administration of a low tissue culture passage rubella virus strain, the Brown strain. The Brown strain virus proved to be a suitable challenge virus. In the References 1. Perkins, F.T.: A Review of Recent Studies With Rubella Vaccines , Public Health 81:284-288 ( (Sept) ) 1967.Crossref 2. Buynak, E.V., et al: Live Attenuated Rubella Virus Vaccines Prepared in Duck Embryo Cell Culture: I. Development and Clinical Testing , JAMA 204:195-200 ( (April 15) ) 1968.Crossref 3. Detels, R., et al: "The Efficacy of HPV-77 Rubella Vaccine in the Prevention of Disease," in Proceedings of the 23rd Symposium on Microbiological Standardization: Rubella Vaccines , London, (November) 1968, Basel, Switzerland: S. Karger, 1969. 4. Stewart, G.L., et al: Rubella-Virus Hemagglutination-Inhibition Test , New Eng J Med 276: 554-557 ( (March 9) ) 1967.Crossref 5. Schiff, G.M., and Sever, J.L.: Rubella: Recent Laboratory and Clinical Advances , Progr Med Virol 8:30-61, 1966. 6. Lennette, E.H., and Schmidt, N.J. (eds.): Diagnostic Procedures for Viral and Rickettsial Diseases , ed 3, New York: American Public Health Association, 1964. 7. Artenstein, M.S.; Bellanti, J.A.; and Buescher, E.L.: Identification of the Antiviral Substances in Nasal Secretions , Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 117:558-564 ( (Nov) ) 1964.Crossref 8. Smith, C.B., et al: Protective Effect of Antibody to Parainfluenza Type 1 Virus , New Eng J Med 275:1145-1152 ( (Nov 24) ) 1966.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1969

References