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Experience With a Totally Implantable Venous Device in Children

Experience With a Totally Implantable Venous Device in Children Abstract • Venous access was attained in 15 children by use of a totally implantable central venous catheter and reservoir. Catheters were in place from 28 to 581 days, giving a cumulative experience of 4,094 days. Although they were well accepted by physicians, parents, and the children, they were not without major complications. These included extravasation of a chemotherapeutic agent in one, migration of the catheter tip to an unacceptable location in another, and catheter thrombosis and catheter-related sepsis in two each. The malpositioned catheter, one of the thrombosed catheters, and both infected catheters were removed. Ease of care, freedom from protruding tubing, and compatibility with normal activities are major positive features of the implantable devices that should be considered when deciding on the type of prolonged central venous access for use in children being treated with cancer. (AJDC 1986;140:69-71) References 1. King OY, Pegelow CH, Wilbur JR: Complications with the use of central venous catheters for venous access in children with cancer , abstract C-341. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1983;2:88. 2. Weber TR, West KW, Grosfeld JL: Broviac central venous catheterization in infants and children . Am J Surg 1983;145:202-204.Crossref 3. Shapiro ED, Wald ER, Nelson KA, et al: Broviac catheter-related bacteremia in oncology patients . AJDC 1982;136:679-681. 4. Gyves J, Ensminger W, Niederhuber J, et al: Totally implanted system for intravenous chemotherapy in patients with cancer . Am J Med 1982;73:841-845.Crossref 5. Bothe A, Piccione W, Ambrosino JJ, et al: Implantable central venous access system . Am J Surg 1984;147:565-569.Crossref 6. Van Leuwen EF, Krul EJ, Langeveld NE, et al: Continuous venous access during long-term chemotherapy in children by means of the Port-a-Cath , abstract C-431. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1984;3:110. 7. Press OW, Ramsey PG, Larson EB, et al: Hickman catheter infections in patients with malignancies . Medicine 1984;63:189-200.Crossref 8. Cruz J, Paschold E, Sterchi M, et al: Evaluation of a totally implantable system for venous access , abstract C-392. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1983;3:101. 9. Harvey W, Lombardo F, Reed K: Evaluation of a totally implantable venous access system , abstract C-430. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1984;3:110. 10. Gebarski SS, Gebarski KS: Chemotherapy port 'twiddler's syndrome.' Cancer 1984;54:38-39.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1986.02140150071040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Venous access was attained in 15 children by use of a totally implantable central venous catheter and reservoir. Catheters were in place from 28 to 581 days, giving a cumulative experience of 4,094 days. Although they were well accepted by physicians, parents, and the children, they were not without major complications. These included extravasation of a chemotherapeutic agent in one, migration of the catheter tip to an unacceptable location in another, and catheter thrombosis and catheter-related sepsis in two each. The malpositioned catheter, one of the thrombosed catheters, and both infected catheters were removed. Ease of care, freedom from protruding tubing, and compatibility with normal activities are major positive features of the implantable devices that should be considered when deciding on the type of prolonged central venous access for use in children being treated with cancer. (AJDC 1986;140:69-71) References 1. King OY, Pegelow CH, Wilbur JR: Complications with the use of central venous catheters for venous access in children with cancer , abstract C-341. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1983;2:88. 2. Weber TR, West KW, Grosfeld JL: Broviac central venous catheterization in infants and children . Am J Surg 1983;145:202-204.Crossref 3. Shapiro ED, Wald ER, Nelson KA, et al: Broviac catheter-related bacteremia in oncology patients . AJDC 1982;136:679-681. 4. Gyves J, Ensminger W, Niederhuber J, et al: Totally implanted system for intravenous chemotherapy in patients with cancer . Am J Med 1982;73:841-845.Crossref 5. Bothe A, Piccione W, Ambrosino JJ, et al: Implantable central venous access system . Am J Surg 1984;147:565-569.Crossref 6. Van Leuwen EF, Krul EJ, Langeveld NE, et al: Continuous venous access during long-term chemotherapy in children by means of the Port-a-Cath , abstract C-431. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1984;3:110. 7. Press OW, Ramsey PG, Larson EB, et al: Hickman catheter infections in patients with malignancies . Medicine 1984;63:189-200.Crossref 8. Cruz J, Paschold E, Sterchi M, et al: Evaluation of a totally implantable system for venous access , abstract C-392. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1983;3:101. 9. Harvey W, Lombardo F, Reed K: Evaluation of a totally implantable venous access system , abstract C-430. Proc Am Soc Clin Oncol 1984;3:110. 10. Gebarski SS, Gebarski KS: Chemotherapy port 'twiddler's syndrome.' Cancer 1984;54:38-39.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1986

References