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Exercise and Prostate Cancer: Running From AGE?

Exercise and Prostate Cancer: Running From AGE? The article by Giovannucci et al1 points out another benefit of vigorous activity; it is associated with a slower progression of prostate cancer in men older than 65 years. The authors attribute this to possible hormonal factors. An additional mechanism might also be worth considering. Giovannucci et al1 controlled for diabetes. However, individuals without diabetes but with metabolic syndrome have higher than average levels of glycosylated hemoglobin A1c.2 This indicates that these patients have suboptimal glycemic control and an increased tendency to form advanced glycation end products (AGE). Ishiguro et al3 found that the interaction between AGE and its cognate receptor (RAGE) plays a role in prostate cancer development.3 The AGE-RAGE interaction induced growth and invasion in a prostate cancer cell line (DU145). Exercise has been found to improve glycemic control in older individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.4 It might be worth investigating whether vigorous activity improves glycemic control in older patients with prostate cancer with a tendency toward metabolic syndrome, thus lowering their levels of AGE and attenuating the AGE-RAGE interaction. Exercise might thus help inhibit the development of prostate cancer. Correspondence: Ms Ross, 36 Ridgewood Cir, Wilmington, DE 19809 (celiamaryross@aol.com). References 1. Giovannucci ELLiu YLeitzmann MF et al. A prospective study of physical activity and incident and fatal prostate cancer. Arch Intern Med 2005;1651005- 1010PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Osei KRhinesmith SGaillard TSchuster D Is glycosylated hemoglobin A1c a surrogate for metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic, first-degree relatives of African-American patients with type 2 diabetes? J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2003;884596- 4601PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Ishiguro HNakaigawa NMiyoshi Y et al. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its ligand, amphoterin are overexpressed and associated with prostate cancer development. Prostate 2005;6492- 100PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 4. Castaneda CLayne JEMunoz-Orians L et al. A randomized controlled trial of resistance exercise training to improve glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2002;252335- 2341PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Exercise and Prostate Cancer: Running From AGE?

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 165 (21) – Nov 28, 2005

Exercise and Prostate Cancer: Running From AGE?

Abstract

The article by Giovannucci et al1 points out another benefit of vigorous activity; it is associated with a slower progression of prostate cancer in men older than 65 years. The authors attribute this to possible hormonal factors. An additional mechanism might also be worth considering. Giovannucci et al1 controlled for diabetes. However, individuals without diabetes but with metabolic syndrome have higher than average levels of glycosylated hemoglobin A1c.2 This indicates that these patients...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.165.21.2538-b
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The article by Giovannucci et al1 points out another benefit of vigorous activity; it is associated with a slower progression of prostate cancer in men older than 65 years. The authors attribute this to possible hormonal factors. An additional mechanism might also be worth considering. Giovannucci et al1 controlled for diabetes. However, individuals without diabetes but with metabolic syndrome have higher than average levels of glycosylated hemoglobin A1c.2 This indicates that these patients have suboptimal glycemic control and an increased tendency to form advanced glycation end products (AGE). Ishiguro et al3 found that the interaction between AGE and its cognate receptor (RAGE) plays a role in prostate cancer development.3 The AGE-RAGE interaction induced growth and invasion in a prostate cancer cell line (DU145). Exercise has been found to improve glycemic control in older individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.4 It might be worth investigating whether vigorous activity improves glycemic control in older patients with prostate cancer with a tendency toward metabolic syndrome, thus lowering their levels of AGE and attenuating the AGE-RAGE interaction. Exercise might thus help inhibit the development of prostate cancer. Correspondence: Ms Ross, 36 Ridgewood Cir, Wilmington, DE 19809 (celiamaryross@aol.com). References 1. Giovannucci ELLiu YLeitzmann MF et al. A prospective study of physical activity and incident and fatal prostate cancer. Arch Intern Med 2005;1651005- 1010PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Osei KRhinesmith SGaillard TSchuster D Is glycosylated hemoglobin A1c a surrogate for metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic, first-degree relatives of African-American patients with type 2 diabetes? J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2003;884596- 4601PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Ishiguro HNakaigawa NMiyoshi Y et al. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its ligand, amphoterin are overexpressed and associated with prostate cancer development. Prostate 2005;6492- 100PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 4. Castaneda CLayne JEMunoz-Orians L et al. A randomized controlled trial of resistance exercise training to improve glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2002;252335- 2341PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 28, 2005

Keywords: exercise,prostate cancer

References