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Exaggerated Physiologic Speckled Mottling of the Limbs

Exaggerated Physiologic Speckled Mottling of the Limbs Abstract Various forms of physiologic vascular mottling of the skin1 are recognized that differ from mottling of the limbs seen as a reaction to cold.2 Physiologic mottling is thought to be due to increased vascular tone in arteriolar territories3 and is not usually severe enough to warrant referral to a dermatologist. We report herein a case of physiologic mottling severe enough to prompt the patient to seek medical advice. Report of a Case A 20-year-old woman had a four-year history of asymptomatic white macules on the limbs. The macules were most florid during the winter, but were present during the summer months as well, when they caused considerable cosmetic disability because they were less easily covered by clothing. Only immersion in warm water caused the macules to disappear completely. Onset was not obviously related to the menarche, which started when the patient was 13 years old, or to the taking of a combined oral contraceptive References 1. Lewis T: The Blood Vessels of the Human Skin and Their Responses . London, Shaw & Sons Ltd, 1927. 2. Rothman S: Circulation and vascular reactions , in Physiology and Biochemistry of the Skin . Chicago, University Press, 1954, pp 61-119. 3. Greaves MW, Birkett D, Johnson C: Nevus anemicus: A unique catecholamine-dependent nevus . Arch Dermatol 1970;102:172-176.Crossref 4. Sinclair D: Motor nerves and their reflexes , in Jarrett A (ed): Physiology and Pathophysiology of the Skin . London, Academic Press, 1973, vol 2, p 499. 5. Fox R, Hilton S: Bradykinin formation in human skin as a factor in heat vasodilatation . J Physiol 1958;142:219-232. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Exaggerated Physiologic Speckled Mottling of the Limbs

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 121 (3) – Mar 1, 1985

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1985.01660030137038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Various forms of physiologic vascular mottling of the skin1 are recognized that differ from mottling of the limbs seen as a reaction to cold.2 Physiologic mottling is thought to be due to increased vascular tone in arteriolar territories3 and is not usually severe enough to warrant referral to a dermatologist. We report herein a case of physiologic mottling severe enough to prompt the patient to seek medical advice. Report of a Case A 20-year-old woman had a four-year history of asymptomatic white macules on the limbs. The macules were most florid during the winter, but were present during the summer months as well, when they caused considerable cosmetic disability because they were less easily covered by clothing. Only immersion in warm water caused the macules to disappear completely. Onset was not obviously related to the menarche, which started when the patient was 13 years old, or to the taking of a combined oral contraceptive References 1. Lewis T: The Blood Vessels of the Human Skin and Their Responses . London, Shaw & Sons Ltd, 1927. 2. Rothman S: Circulation and vascular reactions , in Physiology and Biochemistry of the Skin . Chicago, University Press, 1954, pp 61-119. 3. Greaves MW, Birkett D, Johnson C: Nevus anemicus: A unique catecholamine-dependent nevus . Arch Dermatol 1970;102:172-176.Crossref 4. Sinclair D: Motor nerves and their reflexes , in Jarrett A (ed): Physiology and Pathophysiology of the Skin . London, Academic Press, 1973, vol 2, p 499. 5. Fox R, Hilton S: Bradykinin formation in human skin as a factor in heat vasodilatation . J Physiol 1958;142:219-232.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1985

References