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Evaluation of the Sierra-Sheldon Tracheotome

Evaluation of the Sierra-Sheldon Tracheotome Abstract Emergency tracheotomy is life-saving when performed for respiratory obstruction not correctible by nonsurgical means. As such, it is a procedure which should be within the capabilities of every physician. We questioned more than 1,500 medical officers newly inducted into the U. S. Army and found that approximately 50% of them either had not seen or had not done a tracheotomy. These physicians represent a cross section both of the graduates of all of the medical schools in the United States and practitioners of most of the medical specialties. In order to avoid an unnecessarily high mortality rate from acute respiratory obstruction incident to either war or disaster, it is essential that all physicians be taught to do tracheotomies. With the initiation of a practical method for teaching the principles of combat surgery to physicians1 at the Army Medical Service School, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, all References 1. Ziperman, H. H.: A Method of Teaching Combat Surgery , J. M. Educ. 31:746-750 ( (Nov.) ) 1956. 2. Shelden, C. H.; Pudenz, R. H.; Freshwater, D. B., and Crue, B. L.: New Method for Tracheotomy , J. Neurosurg. 12:428-431 ( (July) ) 1955.Crossref 3. Crue, B. L.: Use of the Shelden Tracheotome in Military Medicine , Armed Forces M. J. 7:1193-1195 ( (Aug.) ) 1957. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Evaluation of the Sierra-Sheldon Tracheotome

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1959.00730030102013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Emergency tracheotomy is life-saving when performed for respiratory obstruction not correctible by nonsurgical means. As such, it is a procedure which should be within the capabilities of every physician. We questioned more than 1,500 medical officers newly inducted into the U. S. Army and found that approximately 50% of them either had not seen or had not done a tracheotomy. These physicians represent a cross section both of the graduates of all of the medical schools in the United States and practitioners of most of the medical specialties. In order to avoid an unnecessarily high mortality rate from acute respiratory obstruction incident to either war or disaster, it is essential that all physicians be taught to do tracheotomies. With the initiation of a practical method for teaching the principles of combat surgery to physicians1 at the Army Medical Service School, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, all References 1. Ziperman, H. H.: A Method of Teaching Combat Surgery , J. M. Educ. 31:746-750 ( (Nov.) ) 1956. 2. Shelden, C. H.; Pudenz, R. H.; Freshwater, D. B., and Crue, B. L.: New Method for Tracheotomy , J. Neurosurg. 12:428-431 ( (July) ) 1955.Crossref 3. Crue, B. L.: Use of the Shelden Tracheotome in Military Medicine , Armed Forces M. J. 7:1193-1195 ( (Aug.) ) 1957.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1959

References