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Evaluation of Congenital Syphilis Surveillance System—New Jersey, 1993

Evaluation of Congenital Syphilis Surveillance System—New Jersey, 1993 Abstract TO MONITOR disease burden and trends ASsociated with congenital syphilis (CS), effective prevention programs require a surveillance system that identifies CS cases in an accurate and timely manner. Before 1988, comprehensive CS surveillance was difficult for health departments to conduct because documentation of infection in infants required complex and costly long-term follow-up for up to 1 year after delivery; follow-up often was incomplete, and many infected infants were not identified. To estimate the public health burden of CS more accurately and eliminate long-term follow-up of infants by health department personnel, in 1988 CDC implemented a new CS case definition.1 Rather than relying on documentation of infection in the infant, the new case definition presumes that an infant is infected if it cannot be proven that an infected mother was adequately treated for syphilis before or during pregnancy.2 During 1993-1994, the Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and Control Program of References 1. DC. Guidelines for the prevention and control of congenital syphilis . MMWR 1988;37(suppl no. (S-1) ). 2. CDC. Congenital syphilis case investigation and reporting instructions . Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, CDC, 1992. 3. CDC. Congenital syphilis--New York City, 1986-1988 . MMWR 1989;38:825-829. 4. Schultz KF, Cates W, O'Mara PR. Pregnancy loss, infant death, and suffering: the legacy of syphilis and gonorrhea in Africa . Genitourin Med 1987; 63:320-325. 5. Petrone ME, Teter MJ, Freund CG, Porter J, Parkin WE, Spitalny KC. Epidemiology of congenital syphilis . N J Med 1989;86:965-969. 6. Zenker PN, Berman SB. Congenital syphilis: reporting and reality . Am J Public Health 1990; 80:271-272.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Evaluation of Congenital Syphilis Surveillance System—New Jersey, 1993

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 131 (9) – Sep 1, 1995

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1995.01690210017002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract TO MONITOR disease burden and trends ASsociated with congenital syphilis (CS), effective prevention programs require a surveillance system that identifies CS cases in an accurate and timely manner. Before 1988, comprehensive CS surveillance was difficult for health departments to conduct because documentation of infection in infants required complex and costly long-term follow-up for up to 1 year after delivery; follow-up often was incomplete, and many infected infants were not identified. To estimate the public health burden of CS more accurately and eliminate long-term follow-up of infants by health department personnel, in 1988 CDC implemented a new CS case definition.1 Rather than relying on documentation of infection in the infant, the new case definition presumes that an infant is infected if it cannot be proven that an infected mother was adequately treated for syphilis before or during pregnancy.2 During 1993-1994, the Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and Control Program of References 1. DC. Guidelines for the prevention and control of congenital syphilis . MMWR 1988;37(suppl no. (S-1) ). 2. CDC. Congenital syphilis case investigation and reporting instructions . Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, CDC, 1992. 3. CDC. Congenital syphilis--New York City, 1986-1988 . MMWR 1989;38:825-829. 4. Schultz KF, Cates W, O'Mara PR. Pregnancy loss, infant death, and suffering: the legacy of syphilis and gonorrhea in Africa . Genitourin Med 1987; 63:320-325. 5. Petrone ME, Teter MJ, Freund CG, Porter J, Parkin WE, Spitalny KC. Epidemiology of congenital syphilis . N J Med 1989;86:965-969. 6. Zenker PN, Berman SB. Congenital syphilis: reporting and reality . Am J Public Health 1990; 80:271-272.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1995

References