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Ethics, Regulation, and Comparative Effectiveness Research

Ethics, Regulation, and Comparative Effectiveness Research Opinion Ethics, Regulation, and Comparative Effectiveness VIEWPOINT Research Time for a Change TheUShealthcaresystemispoisedtolearnmoreabout and becomes particularly striking when contrasted with Richard Platt, MD, MS Harvard Pilgrim Health preventing,diagnosing,andtreatingillnessthanhasever hospitals’ authority to change system-level care with- Care Institute and been possible. This change is powered by the increas- out any evaluation, transparency, or patient consulta- Harvard Medical ing commitment to comparative effectiveness re- tion—changing, for example, the ratio of nurses to pa- School, Boston, search, increases in practice-based research, and the in- tients and similar administrative decisions that could Massachusetts. creasing availability of data arising from electronic health have profound effects on patient outcomes. The irony Nancy E. Kass, ScD information systems to help patients, clinicians, and oth- deepens when consent requirements become barriers Johns Hopkins Berman ers understand who benefits from which treatments. to even low-risk studies intended to identify strategies Institute of Bioethics Much can be learned by observing the outcomes of the to protect patients. An increasingly germane question and Johns Hopkins varied decisions that clinicians and hospitals make. How- for policy and for ethics is what level of oversight of com- Bloomberg School of Public Health, ever, for many health care questions, it is important to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Ethics, Regulation, and Comparative Effectiveness Research

JAMA , Volume 311 (15) – Apr 16, 2014

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2014.2144
pmid
24626256
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion Ethics, Regulation, and Comparative Effectiveness VIEWPOINT Research Time for a Change TheUShealthcaresystemispoisedtolearnmoreabout and becomes particularly striking when contrasted with Richard Platt, MD, MS Harvard Pilgrim Health preventing,diagnosing,andtreatingillnessthanhasever hospitals’ authority to change system-level care with- Care Institute and been possible. This change is powered by the increas- out any evaluation, transparency, or patient consulta- Harvard Medical ing commitment to comparative effectiveness re- tion—changing, for example, the ratio of nurses to pa- School, Boston, search, increases in practice-based research, and the in- tients and similar administrative decisions that could Massachusetts. creasing availability of data arising from electronic health have profound effects on patient outcomes. The irony Nancy E. Kass, ScD information systems to help patients, clinicians, and oth- deepens when consent requirements become barriers Johns Hopkins Berman ers understand who benefits from which treatments. to even low-risk studies intended to identify strategies Institute of Bioethics Much can be learned by observing the outcomes of the to protect patients. An increasingly germane question and Johns Hopkins varied decisions that clinicians and hospitals make. How- for policy and for ethics is what level of oversight of com- Bloomberg School of Public Health, ever, for many health care questions, it is important to

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 16, 2014

References