Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Estrogens and Disease Prevention

Estrogens and Disease Prevention Abstract Due to the aging of the US population, the number of women over the age of 50 years, currently more than 40 million, will substantially increase during the next several decades. This will result in increased incidence and cost for the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, ie, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and osteoporosis. Methods complementary to therapy are needed to prevent the anticipated increase in newly diagnosed cases of these diseases, thus improving the quality of life of postmenopausal women. It is timely to question whether estrogen is one such chemical or chemopreventive agent that can prevent (or minimize) these diseases. It has been reported that the use of estrogen by postmenopausal women has beneficial effects on coronary heart disease and osteoporosis but deleterious effects on cancer, most notably endometrial cancer.1 In this issue of the Archives, two articles address the role of estrogen in disease prevention among References 1. Ernster VL, Bush TL, Huggins GR, et al. Benefits and risks of menopausal estrogen and/or progestin hormone use . Prev Med 1988;17:201-223.Crossref 2. Henderson BE, Paganim-Hill A, Ross RK. Decreased mortality in users of estrogen replacement therapy . Arch Intern Med. 1991;151:75-78.Crossref 3. Schroeder SA, Krupp MA, Tierney LM, ed. Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment . Los Altos, Calif: Lange Medical Publishers; 1988. 4. Dupont WD, Page DL. Menopausal Estrogen Replacement Therapy and Breast Cancer . Arch Intern Med. 1991;151:67-72.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Estrogens and Disease Prevention

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 151 (1) – Jan 1, 1991

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/estrogens-and-disease-prevention-7nraJC0hg7
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1991.00400010041001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Due to the aging of the US population, the number of women over the age of 50 years, currently more than 40 million, will substantially increase during the next several decades. This will result in increased incidence and cost for the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, ie, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and osteoporosis. Methods complementary to therapy are needed to prevent the anticipated increase in newly diagnosed cases of these diseases, thus improving the quality of life of postmenopausal women. It is timely to question whether estrogen is one such chemical or chemopreventive agent that can prevent (or minimize) these diseases. It has been reported that the use of estrogen by postmenopausal women has beneficial effects on coronary heart disease and osteoporosis but deleterious effects on cancer, most notably endometrial cancer.1 In this issue of the Archives, two articles address the role of estrogen in disease prevention among References 1. Ernster VL, Bush TL, Huggins GR, et al. Benefits and risks of menopausal estrogen and/or progestin hormone use . Prev Med 1988;17:201-223.Crossref 2. Henderson BE, Paganim-Hill A, Ross RK. Decreased mortality in users of estrogen replacement therapy . Arch Intern Med. 1991;151:75-78.Crossref 3. Schroeder SA, Krupp MA, Tierney LM, ed. Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment . Los Altos, Calif: Lange Medical Publishers; 1988. 4. Dupont WD, Page DL. Menopausal Estrogen Replacement Therapy and Breast Cancer . Arch Intern Med. 1991;151:67-72.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1991

References