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Essays in Medical Education: II: The Pediatric Outpatient Department as a Pedagogical Challenge

Essays in Medical Education: II: The Pediatric Outpatient Department as a Pedagogical Challenge Abstract THE MESSAGE that this report aims to convey lies in the exciting opportunity open to the teacher in the pediatric outpatient clinic. An energetic teaching program in the clinic can contribute materially to the learning experience of medical students, interns, and residents, and can be highly rewarding to the teacher. The pediatric clinic obviously cannot stand alone, for many of the objectives of undergraduate medical education and of the pediatric residency are better accomplished on inpatient services. The pediatric clinic can, however, reinforce and broaden much of the inpatient experience; furthermore, it can provide a learning experience unrivaled within the curriculum for the areas of growth and development, applied preventive medicine, the continuum of nonepisodic care of both well children and those with chronic disease, and the consequences of the socioeconomic environment of the patient—the latter area being one for which Richard Cabot crusaded years ago at the Massachusetts General References 1. Miller, G.E. (ed.): Teaching and Learning in Medical Schools , Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1961. 2. Weinerman, E.R., and Steiger, W.A.: Ambulatory Service in the Teaching Hospital , J Med Educ 39:1020 ( (Nov) ) 1964. 3. Wishik, S.M.: Health Supervision of Young Children , New York: American Public Health Association, 1955. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Essays in Medical Education: II: The Pediatric Outpatient Department as a Pedagogical Challenge

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1965.02090030195017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE MESSAGE that this report aims to convey lies in the exciting opportunity open to the teacher in the pediatric outpatient clinic. An energetic teaching program in the clinic can contribute materially to the learning experience of medical students, interns, and residents, and can be highly rewarding to the teacher. The pediatric clinic obviously cannot stand alone, for many of the objectives of undergraduate medical education and of the pediatric residency are better accomplished on inpatient services. The pediatric clinic can, however, reinforce and broaden much of the inpatient experience; furthermore, it can provide a learning experience unrivaled within the curriculum for the areas of growth and development, applied preventive medicine, the continuum of nonepisodic care of both well children and those with chronic disease, and the consequences of the socioeconomic environment of the patient—the latter area being one for which Richard Cabot crusaded years ago at the Massachusetts General References 1. Miller, G.E. (ed.): Teaching and Learning in Medical Schools , Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1961. 2. Weinerman, E.R., and Steiger, W.A.: Ambulatory Service in the Teaching Hospital , J Med Educ 39:1020 ( (Nov) ) 1964. 3. Wishik, S.M.: Health Supervision of Young Children , New York: American Public Health Association, 1955.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1965

References