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ERUPTIVE FEVER WITH STOMATITIS AND OPHTHALMIA

ERUPTIVE FEVER WITH STOMATITIS AND OPHTHALMIA Stevens and Johnson1 in 1922 reported two cases of "A New Eruptive Fever Associated with Stomatitis and Ophthalmia" in children. They could find no description of a similar cutaneous eruption and thought that no known diagnosis could be made from the symptoms and course of the disease. The eruption was generalized and presented well defined characteristics. It was first noted on the back of the neck and chest, and spread to the face, arms and legs during a period of eighteen days. When they first appeared the lesions were dark red, oval macules, varying from 0.5 to 2 cm. in the longest diameter and were without areolae. Within a few days these macules became papular and brownish purple. Some of the larger lesions acquired yellow, dry, necrotic centers. Vesicles and pustules were absent. Subjective symptoms of pain or itching were strikingly absent. There were no lesions on the scalp, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

ERUPTIVE FEVER WITH STOMATITIS AND OPHTHALMIA

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1935 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1935.01970050046003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Stevens and Johnson1 in 1922 reported two cases of "A New Eruptive Fever Associated with Stomatitis and Ophthalmia" in children. They could find no description of a similar cutaneous eruption and thought that no known diagnosis could be made from the symptoms and course of the disease. The eruption was generalized and presented well defined characteristics. It was first noted on the back of the neck and chest, and spread to the face, arms and legs during a period of eighteen days. When they first appeared the lesions were dark red, oval macules, varying from 0.5 to 2 cm. in the longest diameter and were without areolae. Within a few days these macules became papular and brownish purple. Some of the larger lesions acquired yellow, dry, necrotic centers. Vesicles and pustules were absent. Subjective symptoms of pain or itching were strikingly absent. There were no lesions on the scalp,

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1935

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