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Error in Term Definition

Error in Term Definition In the Original Investigation titled “Association Between Olfactory Dysfunction and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease Dementia,”1 published online November 16, 2015, there was an error in the first sentence of the fourth paragraph of the Methods section. The sentence should read as follows: “Olfaction was assessed using the Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) version A,36 which consists of 6 food-related and 6 non–food-related smells (cherry, clove, strawberry, menthol, pineapple, lemon, leather, lilac, smoke, soap, natural gas, and rose).” This article was corrected online. References 1. Roberts RO, Christianson TJ, Kremers WK, et al. Association between olfactory dysfunction and amnestic mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer disease dementia [published online November 16, 2015]. JAMA Neurol. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.2952.Google Scholar http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Neurology American Medical Association

Error in Term Definition

JAMA Neurology , Volume 73 (4) – Apr 1, 2016

Error in Term Definition

Abstract

In the Original Investigation titled “Association Between Olfactory Dysfunction and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease Dementia,”1 published online November 16, 2015, there was an error in the first sentence of the fourth paragraph of the Methods section. The sentence should read as follows: “Olfaction was assessed using the Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) version A,36 which consists of 6 food-related and 6 non–food-related smells (cherry,...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6149
eISSN
2168-6157
DOI
10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.0070
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the Original Investigation titled “Association Between Olfactory Dysfunction and Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease Dementia,”1 published online November 16, 2015, there was an error in the first sentence of the fourth paragraph of the Methods section. The sentence should read as follows: “Olfaction was assessed using the Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) version A,36 which consists of 6 food-related and 6 non–food-related smells (cherry, clove, strawberry, menthol, pineapple, lemon, leather, lilac, smoke, soap, natural gas, and rose).” This article was corrected online. References 1. Roberts RO, Christianson TJ, Kremers WK, et al. Association between olfactory dysfunction and amnestic mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer disease dementia [published online November 16, 2015]. JAMA Neurol. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.2952.Google Scholar

Journal

JAMA NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 2016

References