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Epidermal Changes Associated with Sclerosing Hemangiomas

Epidermal Changes Associated with Sclerosing Hemangiomas Abstract As a rule, dermal neoplasms are associated either with no alteration of the overlying epidermis or with simple atrophy, the latter as if by pressure from the dermal mass. However, there are several dermal tumors which characteristically and contrarywise provoke epithelial activity. The most familiar of these is the so-called granular-cell myoblastoma, which is usually characterized by an associated pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, so striking as to be mistaken occasionally for a squamouscell carcinoma. The pathogenesis of this reaction has so far eluded clarification. Not generally appreciated is the fact that the sclerosing hemangioma (dermatofibroma lenticulare, histiocytoma, nodular subepidermal fibrosis) is also frequently overlaid by evidence of epidermal activity which takes a variety of morphologic forms, including neoplasia. Because of the dearth of information concerning both the existence and nature of the phenomenon embodying the concomitance of epidermal and dermal lesions, the following References 1. Allen, A. C.: The Skin: A Clinicopathologic Treatise , St. Louis, The C. V. Mosby Company, 1954. 2. Biberstein, H.: Fibrome mit atypischer Epithelwucherung , Arch. Derm. u. Syph. 164:69, 1931,Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Epidermal Changes Associated with Sclerosing Hemangiomas

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1959.01560200028002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract As a rule, dermal neoplasms are associated either with no alteration of the overlying epidermis or with simple atrophy, the latter as if by pressure from the dermal mass. However, there are several dermal tumors which characteristically and contrarywise provoke epithelial activity. The most familiar of these is the so-called granular-cell myoblastoma, which is usually characterized by an associated pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, so striking as to be mistaken occasionally for a squamouscell carcinoma. The pathogenesis of this reaction has so far eluded clarification. Not generally appreciated is the fact that the sclerosing hemangioma (dermatofibroma lenticulare, histiocytoma, nodular subepidermal fibrosis) is also frequently overlaid by evidence of epidermal activity which takes a variety of morphologic forms, including neoplasia. Because of the dearth of information concerning both the existence and nature of the phenomenon embodying the concomitance of epidermal and dermal lesions, the following References 1. Allen, A. C.: The Skin: A Clinicopathologic Treatise , St. Louis, The C. V. Mosby Company, 1954. 2. Biberstein, H.: Fibrome mit atypischer Epithelwucherung , Arch. Derm. u. Syph. 164:69, 1931,Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1959

References

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