Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

EPIDEMIC CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS.

EPIDEMIC CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. Just as there are numerous forms of arthritis due to different etiologic factors, but one in particular due to a specific micro-organism and characterized by a definite symptomatology, namely, acute rheumatic polyarthritis, so also among the several varieties of meningitis of diverse origin there stands out one different from all the rest and dependent on its own specific bacterial cause, namely, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis. While no doubt cases of the latter disease had been recognized previously, its epidemic occurrence was first noted at Geneva in 1805. A year later the occurrence of an epidemic at Medfield. Mass., was described independently, and a most complete report on the subject was made to the Massachusetts Medical Society in 1809 by a committee appointed for the purpose. In 1811 a classical study of the disease was published by Elisha North of Goshen, Conn., and an admirable account of its history and its relation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

EPIDEMIC CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS.

JAMA , Volume XLIV (12) – Mar 25, 1905

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/epidemic-cerebrospinal-meningitis-XDNcL0w6df
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.02500390044004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Just as there are numerous forms of arthritis due to different etiologic factors, but one in particular due to a specific micro-organism and characterized by a definite symptomatology, namely, acute rheumatic polyarthritis, so also among the several varieties of meningitis of diverse origin there stands out one different from all the rest and dependent on its own specific bacterial cause, namely, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis. While no doubt cases of the latter disease had been recognized previously, its epidemic occurrence was first noted at Geneva in 1805. A year later the occurrence of an epidemic at Medfield. Mass., was described independently, and a most complete report on the subject was made to the Massachusetts Medical Society in 1809 by a committee appointed for the purpose. In 1811 a classical study of the disease was published by Elisha North of Goshen, Conn., and an admirable account of its history and its relation

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 25, 1905

There are no references for this article.