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EPENDYMOMA OF THE FOURTH VENTRICLE IN AN INFANT UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE

EPENDYMOMA OF THE FOURTH VENTRICLE IN AN INFANT UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE BRAIN tumors occur infrequently during the first years of life and usually are not recognized as such prior to surgical exploration or autopsy examination. In a recent hospital admission an infant was observed who presented signs and symptoms suggestive of a lesion in the cerebellopontine region. These findings, to be described more fully later, led to a presumptive diagnosis of a brain tumor which was later confirmed at autopsy. REPORT OF CASE G. W., an 11-month-old Negro girl, was admitted to Kings County Hospital (State University Division) on Oct. 27, 1951, because of a stiff neck of one day's duration. Approximately two weeks prior to admission the infant became anorectic, showed evidence of weight loss, and reacted with increased irritability on being handled. Three days prior to admission the mother observed that the infant had become less irritable, moderately lethargic, and unresponsive to environmental stimuli. No history of fever, cough, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

EPENDYMOMA OF THE FOURTH VENTRICLE IN AN INFANT UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050080617007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BRAIN tumors occur infrequently during the first years of life and usually are not recognized as such prior to surgical exploration or autopsy examination. In a recent hospital admission an infant was observed who presented signs and symptoms suggestive of a lesion in the cerebellopontine region. These findings, to be described more fully later, led to a presumptive diagnosis of a brain tumor which was later confirmed at autopsy. REPORT OF CASE G. W., an 11-month-old Negro girl, was admitted to Kings County Hospital (State University Division) on Oct. 27, 1951, because of a stiff neck of one day's duration. Approximately two weeks prior to admission the infant became anorectic, showed evidence of weight loss, and reacted with increased irritability on being handled. Three days prior to admission the mother observed that the infant had become less irritable, moderately lethargic, and unresponsive to environmental stimuli. No history of fever, cough,

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1953

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