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Environmental Phthalate Exposure and the Odds of Preterm Birth

Environmental Phthalate Exposure and the Odds of Preterm Birth Opinion Editorial Environmental Phthalate Exposure and the Odds of Preterm Birth An Important Contribution to Environmental Reproductive Epidemiology Shanna H. Swan, PhD In this issue of JAMA Pediatrics, Ferguson et al make an im- cluded in the study by Ferguson et al. Thus, the statistical power portant public health contribution by demonstrating a siz- in this article far outweighs that in the entire previously pub- able impact of phthalates, a class of commonly used chemi- lished literature. cals, on a health outcome of major public health concern: the Unlike other studies of preterm delivery, which lacked suf- growing burden of preterm birth. Worldwide, 15 million ba- ficient sample size to subdivide their cases, Ferguson et al ex- bies are born preterm (<37 amined associations between phthalates and spontaneous pre- weeks’ gestation), with rates term deliveries (n = 57) separately from these associations with increasing over 2 decades in medically indicated preterm deliveries (n = 73). Using this Related article page 61 almost all countries that have stratification, they were able to demonstrate a very signifi- reliable data. While the regions with the highest preterm birth cant modification of the effect of phthalate exposure by the rates in 2010 were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Environmental Phthalate Exposure and the Odds of Preterm Birth

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 168 (1) – Jan 1, 2014

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.4215
pmid
24247638
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion Editorial Environmental Phthalate Exposure and the Odds of Preterm Birth An Important Contribution to Environmental Reproductive Epidemiology Shanna H. Swan, PhD In this issue of JAMA Pediatrics, Ferguson et al make an im- cluded in the study by Ferguson et al. Thus, the statistical power portant public health contribution by demonstrating a siz- in this article far outweighs that in the entire previously pub- able impact of phthalates, a class of commonly used chemi- lished literature. cals, on a health outcome of major public health concern: the Unlike other studies of preterm delivery, which lacked suf- growing burden of preterm birth. Worldwide, 15 million ba- ficient sample size to subdivide their cases, Ferguson et al ex- bies are born preterm (<37 amined associations between phthalates and spontaneous pre- weeks’ gestation), with rates term deliveries (n = 57) separately from these associations with increasing over 2 decades in medically indicated preterm deliveries (n = 73). Using this Related article page 61 almost all countries that have stratification, they were able to demonstrate a very signifi- reliable data. While the regions with the highest preterm birth cant modification of the effect of phthalate exposure by the rates in 2010 were

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2014

References