Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Entry of Physician-Learner Into the National Plan

Entry of Physician-Learner Into the National Plan Abstract ONE OF THE great problems in developing a presentation of any given subject matter in continuing medical education is that of securing agreement on just what the proper essentials of good clinical management are. There are, in fact, no well-defined criteria of high quality performance of the diagnostic and therapeutic processes. There may be great variation from center to center in how any particular problem may be handled. The science and the art of medical practice do find expression in the medical literature, but for the most part they really depend upon guided learning, which is based on repetitive clinical experiences in which the physician acquires a certain amount of knowledge, some technical skills and some rather definite attitudes towards the problems of medicine. There is not objective uniformity either in the content or the process of this learning experience. What is really learned by the young physician is an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Entry of Physician-Learner Into the National Plan

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 96 (2) – Aug 1, 1967

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/entry-of-physician-learner-into-the-national-plan-Gz0Jqhpa0M
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1967.01610020021007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract ONE OF THE great problems in developing a presentation of any given subject matter in continuing medical education is that of securing agreement on just what the proper essentials of good clinical management are. There are, in fact, no well-defined criteria of high quality performance of the diagnostic and therapeutic processes. There may be great variation from center to center in how any particular problem may be handled. The science and the art of medical practice do find expression in the medical literature, but for the most part they really depend upon guided learning, which is based on repetitive clinical experiences in which the physician acquires a certain amount of knowledge, some technical skills and some rather definite attitudes towards the problems of medicine. There is not objective uniformity either in the content or the process of this learning experience. What is really learned by the young physician is an

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1967

There are no references for this article.