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Encephalography by the Displacement Technique

Encephalography by the Displacement Technique Abstract The commonly accepted technique of performing encephalography has been to replace a volume of spinal fluid with an equal volume of air or other gases. Adaptations of this technique have been made by Gardner and Nichols,1 by Davidoff and Dyke,2 and by Lindgren,3 who used smaller quantities of gas and/or first injected air before withdrawing any spinal fluid. In 1955 Slosberg et al.4 introduced a new technique of encephalography, which was called the "minimal withdrawal technique." This consisted of injecting 10 to 80 cc. of air into the lumbar subarachnoid space while withdrawing no more than 5 cc. of spinal fluid. A group of 35 patients was studied. Three of these had early papilledema, and four had spinal fluid pressures above 200 mm. H2O.5 An average of 44 cc. of air was injected. Five patients had no headache during the procedure, but these References 1. Gardner, W. J., and Nichols, B. H.: Encephalography in Surgical Lesions of the Brain: Report of 50 Consecutive Cases , Am. J. Cancer 17:342-347, 1933. 2. Davidoff, L. M., and Dyke, C. G.: The Normal Encephalogram , Ed. 3, Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1951. 3. Lindgren, E.: Some Aspects on the Technique of Encephalography , Acta radiol. 31:161-177, 1949.Crossref 4. Slosberg, P.; Bornstein, M., and Lichtenstein, R.: Pneumoencephalography with Minimal Withdrawal of Cerebrospinal Fluid , J. Mt. Sinai Hosp. 21:299-305, 1955. 5. Slosberg, P.: Personal communication to the authors. 6. Slosberg, P., and Bornstein, M.: Pneumoencephalography with Minimal Withdrawal of Cerebrospinal Fluid , A. M. A. Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 74:334-335, 1955. 7. Bohn, S. S.: Reactions of Patients to Encephalography: Analysis of 1000 Consecutive Cases , Bull. Neurol. Inst. New York 6:540-568, 1937. 8. Foldes, F. F., and Arrowood, J. G.: Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Under the Influence of Continuous Subarachnoidal Infusion of Normal Saline , J. Clin. Invest. 27:346-351, 1948. 9. Evans, J. P.: Increased Intracranial Pressure: Its Physiology and Management , S. Clin. North America 36:233-242, 1956. 10. Wolff, H. G.: Headache and Other Head Pain , New York, Oxford University Press, 1948, pp. 124-126. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6886
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1958.02340050026002
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract The commonly accepted technique of performing encephalography has been to replace a volume of spinal fluid with an equal volume of air or other gases. Adaptations of this technique have been made by Gardner and Nichols,1 by Davidoff and Dyke,2 and by Lindgren,3 who used smaller quantities of gas and/or first injected air before withdrawing any spinal fluid. In 1955 Slosberg et al.4 introduced a new technique of encephalography, which was called the "minimal withdrawal technique." This consisted of injecting 10 to 80 cc. of air into the lumbar subarachnoid space while withdrawing no more than 5 cc. of spinal fluid. A group of 35 patients was studied. Three of these had early papilledema, and four had spinal fluid pressures above 200 mm. H2O.5 An average of 44 cc. of air was injected. Five patients had no headache during the procedure, but these References 1. Gardner, W. J., and Nichols, B. H.: Encephalography in Surgical Lesions of the Brain: Report of 50 Consecutive Cases , Am. J. Cancer 17:342-347, 1933. 2. Davidoff, L. M., and Dyke, C. G.: The Normal Encephalogram , Ed. 3, Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1951. 3. Lindgren, E.: Some Aspects on the Technique of Encephalography , Acta radiol. 31:161-177, 1949.Crossref 4. Slosberg, P.; Bornstein, M., and Lichtenstein, R.: Pneumoencephalography with Minimal Withdrawal of Cerebrospinal Fluid , J. Mt. Sinai Hosp. 21:299-305, 1955. 5. Slosberg, P.: Personal communication to the authors. 6. Slosberg, P., and Bornstein, M.: Pneumoencephalography with Minimal Withdrawal of Cerebrospinal Fluid , A. M. A. Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 74:334-335, 1955. 7. Bohn, S. S.: Reactions of Patients to Encephalography: Analysis of 1000 Consecutive Cases , Bull. Neurol. Inst. New York 6:540-568, 1937. 8. Foldes, F. F., and Arrowood, J. G.: Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Under the Influence of Continuous Subarachnoidal Infusion of Normal Saline , J. Clin. Invest. 27:346-351, 1948. 9. Evans, J. P.: Increased Intracranial Pressure: Its Physiology and Management , S. Clin. North America 36:233-242, 1956. 10. Wolff, H. G.: Headache and Other Head Pain , New York, Oxford University Press, 1948, pp. 124-126.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1958

References