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EMERGENCY SERVICE BY AIR

EMERGENCY SERVICE BY AIR Providing medical care for the sick and injured in times of emergency is a dual responsibility for the doctor. While such action is implicit in his role as physician, he also has the personal responsibility— as has each member of the human community—to succor those of his fellows who may be in distress. The medical challenge presented by an emergency is one that physicians have provided for in many ways. Individually, each has accepted calls from those in need—and medical societies, hospitals, and public safety officials have long maintained lists of doctors willing to reply to emergency calls. In rural areas, physicians have installed short-wave radios in their automobiles so that they can be summoned by peace officers if they are needed. And many county and state societies also boast disaster plans for mobilizing medical help for victims of catastrophe. A Medicine at Work report on page 633 outlining the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

EMERGENCY SERVICE BY AIR

JAMA , Volume 171 (6) – Oct 10, 1959

EMERGENCY SERVICE BY AIR

Abstract


Providing medical care for the sick and injured in times of emergency is a dual responsibility for the doctor. While such action is implicit in his role as physician, he also has the personal responsibility— as has each member of the human community—to succor those of his fellows who may be in distress.
The medical challenge presented by an emergency is one that physicians have provided for in many ways. Individually, each has accepted calls from those in...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010240214019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Providing medical care for the sick and injured in times of emergency is a dual responsibility for the doctor. While such action is implicit in his role as physician, he also has the personal responsibility— as has each member of the human community—to succor those of his fellows who may be in distress. The medical challenge presented by an emergency is one that physicians have provided for in many ways. Individually, each has accepted calls from those in need—and medical societies, hospitals, and public safety officials have long maintained lists of doctors willing to reply to emergency calls. In rural areas, physicians have installed short-wave radios in their automobiles so that they can be summoned by peace officers if they are needed. And many county and state societies also boast disaster plans for mobilizing medical help for victims of catastrophe. A Medicine at Work report on page 633 outlining the

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 10, 1959

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